Doctoral Handbook

Introduction

For Students Admitted Fall 2013 and Later

Welcome to the College of Education at UIC!  We are pleased that you have chosen to study with us.  Your work toward a doctoral degree can be exciting, personally fulfilling, and professionally rewarding.  It is a time for you to expand your horizons, challenge your assumptions, and develop intellectually.  It is a time to work hard, learn the field in which you will develop and claim expertise, and conduct original inquiry that will contribute to the knowledge and practice of your chosen area of interest.  Your work toward a doctoral degree is also a time for you to make new friends and colleagues and to work with program faculty, many of whom are national leaders in their fields of study.

The purpose of this handbook is to help you successfully navigate your way through your program.  Following this introduction, Section II provides an overview of doctoral studies in the College of Education.  Section III presents detailed requirements of each doctoral program offered by the College and various concentrations and specializations within them.  Section IV provides information about dissertation research.  Section V introduces the Institutional Review Board (IRB) and the processes students must follow to have their research approved for the ethical treatment of human subjects.  Section VI provides information about the UIC Library and the College of Education’s Educational Technology Laboratory.  Section VII contains information about financial aid.  Finally, Section VIII provides some tips for prospering as a doctoral student in the College of Education at UIC.

In addition to this handbook, it is a good idea to become familiar with the academic requirements and regulations of the UIC Graduate College.  These may be found in the Graduate Catalog, which is available at www.uic.edu/gcat   The catalog provides information about such topics as transfer of credit, registration requirements, leaves of absence, academic ethics and regulations, and grievance procedures. 

Finally, your most important source of information and support is your faculty program advisor.  When you were admitted to your program, you were assigned to a faculty member who shares some of your research interests.  Your advisor will help you develop your program of study, select courses, and plan your program of research.  Your advisor will also help you answer questions and solve problems you may encounter in your work.

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, students with documented disabilities may request reasonable accommodations to enable them to participate fully in their programs.  Such accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

  • Exam modifications
  • Alternative print formats
  • Sign language interpreting
  • Real-time captioning
  • Class relocations
  • Assistance with academic modifications
  • Access problem solving
  • Advocacy and referrals

If you have questions, require accommodations, or need help with access, contact the Disability Resource Center at 1190 Student Services Building (SSB), 312-413-2183 (voice), 877-890-0164 (video phone), or 866-497-1528 ( i 711 relay).  Information is also available on their website: http://www.uic.edu/depts/oaa/disability_resources/.  If you have questions or suggestions about the information in this handbook, please direct them to the coordinator of your doctoral program or to the College of Education Office of Student Services (3145 ETMSW).  Names, telephone numbers, office locations, and e-mail addresses of College administrators, doctoral program coordinators, College department chairs, and staff of the College’s Office of Student Services are contained in the appendices of this handbook.  You may also wish to consult the College of Education’s website on a regular basishttp://www.education.uic.edu.  This handbook is available online through the College’s website.

The Advising Covenant

It is well known that success in Ph.D. programs is connected to the quality of advising received (Adams, 1992; Heinrich, 1995; Johnson and Huwe, 2003; Tuttle, 2000; Zhao et. al., 2005). This success is largely dependent on the development of the advisor-advisee relationship. It is not an exaggeration to say that the single most important factor in the successful and timely completion of a Ph.D. program is an open and productive relationship with your advisor. Your relationship with your advisor in your Ph.D. Program is likely to be qualitatively different from the advising you may have had in your undergraduate or Master’s program. Of course, information, support and advice can be provided by many people, including staff in the College of Education Student Services Office, the Graduate College, your course instructors, and your classmates.  However, there is no substitute for the mentoring that a Ph.D. advisor can provide.  This mentoring can take many forms, including helping you to complete necessary paperwork, select courses, and  develop conceptual frameworks for your research.

 

One metaphor often used to capture the nature of the advisor-advisee relationship is the “apprenticeship” model, in which the student works closely and individually with one faculty member who shares his/her research interests. The student’s goal is not only to acquire the knowledge and skills that are central to the profession, but also to become a member of an intellectual community. However, Walker et al. (2008) make the important point that mentoring involves reciprocal roles, and that students should be “apprenticed with” rather than “apprenticed to” (p. 115) their advisors. To develop this kind of relationship, they recommend some strategies that apply to both advisor and advisee.

 

Know One’s Self and Each Other Well. As each mentoring relationship must be tailored to two sets of needs, motivations and working styles, it is important for the advisor and advisee to understand their separate and mutual goals and negotiate the similarities and differences.

Communicate Clearly and Provide Regular Feedback. Understanding the expectations of each side of the mentoring relationship entails early, frequent, and clear communication. Especially valuable are explicit conversations about expectations about the frequency and format of communication (for example, e-mail, monthly meetings), as well as the range of appropriate topics (for example, advice about coursework, financial aid, career guidelines, teaching, research goals).  These negotiations may head off later misunderstandings.

Most doctoral program faculty members work together to provide a formal and annual process for evaluating students’ progress and giving feedback. However, more frequent and regular feedback between the advisor and advisee is critical to sustaining momentum and avoiding pitfalls in developing a research program.

Take Time. An “apprenticeship with” relationship entails a considerable investment of time and energy from both advisor and advisee. Of course, the amount and nature of the time spent together may vary at different points of the student’s program.

 

The Advisor/Advisee Match

Most programs assign new doctoral students to advisors based on a match in research interests and experiences, using the goal statements that are included in admission portfolios. This first-year advisor will help you develop your program of study, select courses, and plan your program of research. Your advisor will also help you answer questions and solve problems you may encounter in your program.

Of course, students’ research goals often develop and change directions during coursework. If so, it is not unusual for students to change to an advisor whose interests and expertise are a better fit for the new focus. Your department’s Director of Graduate Studies or your doctoral program’s coordinator can provide guidance if you are considering such a change. After communication with both your current and prospective advisors, you may change your advisor at any time during your program. (To change your program advisor, you must complete a Change of Advisor Form. This form may be obtained from the College of Education Office of Student Services.)

 

Advising Covenant

The purpose of the Advising Covenant is to support the advising relationship, which is undergirded by an ethical agreement that the advising process is built upon dynamic mutual expectations in good faith. The Advising Covenant represents a set of expectations for both the advisor and advisee, along the dimensions of sharing professional knowledge, and responsible collaboration.  It aims to serve as a guide that is flexible enough so that the advisor and advisee can meet their particular needs.

Role of Advisors

Share Professional Knowledge

  • Advisors are knowledgeable about their advisees’ department/program requirements, policies and procedures.
  • Advisors provide constructive feedback on program progress and alert advisees when they are or are not meeting expectations. If not meeting expectations, advisor and advisee discuss a plan of action. When needed, advisors provide counsel to advisees regarding the balance of academics and other obligations.
  • Advisors help advisees develop their research interests. They guide advisees by familiarizing them with different paradigms, perspectives, approaches, and resources that may be helpful.
  • Advisors provide information on various career paths open to advisees and in the process discuss advisees’ career goals.
  • Advisors help advisees with search for employment by providing leads and references.
  • In cases where there are mutual research interests, advisors invite/provide advisees with co-participation in advisors’ research and teaching activities.  Examples are co-authorship of a conference presentation, journal article or book chapter, assistance in teaching a course, or help with finding opportunities to do so if the advisees so choose.

 

Collaborate Responsibly – Advisors and Advisees

  • Advisors respond to advisees’ questions within 72 hours (via email, phone or in person, if only to let them know that they have received the message and will respond by a certain date).
  • Advisors keep commitments and meet mutually negotiated deadlines.
  • Advisors work with advisees to plan the course of their study (for example, course schedule and dissertation timeline) to ensure a timely completion of programs.
  • Advisors work with advisees on a meeting schedule that works for advisees based on their stage in their studies. For example, the closer to the dissertation stage, the more often they might need to communicate.
  • Advisors help advisees make connections and “network” with other students, with other faculty, and with other scholars in their respective fields outside of UIC. For example, advisors may invite all their advisees for a group meeting each semester, so advisees can discuss common issues/concerns to create an advising community.
  • Advisors show an interest in their advisees’ interests and/or point them to faculty who may be more appropriate if necessary.
  • Advisors advocate for advisees with others when necessary and appropriate.

Role of Advisees

Share Professional Knowledge

  • Advisees familiarize themselves with departmental/program policies and procedures. They consult with their advisors for clarification about issues specific to their cases. Advisees note suggestions so as to minimize repeat visits/issues.
  • Advisees are self-directed in the sense that they know what their goals are and work towards them. They periodically share their goals with the advisor, including revisions, so that if they need help in terms of direction, guidance, or feedback, their advisors will be better prepared to serve them.
  • Advisees do their best at all times. They maintain high standards of excellence, allowing for the development of more challenging and creative goals.

Collaborate Responsibly - Advisors and Advisees

  • Advisees respond to advisors’ inquiries within 72 hours (via email, phone or in person, if only to let them know that they have received the message and will respond by a certain date).
  • Advisees keep commitments and meet deadlines.
  • Advisees work with their advisors to plan the course of their study (for example, course schedule and dissertation schedule) to ensure a timely completion of program
  • Advisees plan a meeting schedule with their advisors.
  • Advisees are mindful of their advisors’ investment in their own goals and seek ways to also support their advisors.
  • Advisees communicate directly and honestly. Advisees and advisors discuss reasonable time requirements for the review of advisees’ written work. Advisees keep advisors abreast of any changes in their plans and let them know what they need as well as suggest how their advisors can help them.
  • Advisees admit to challenges so that advisors can help with assessment and develop a plan so that these problems do not arise in the future.
  • Advisees are coachable and willing to learn from their advisors. Advisees are open to suggestions by their advisors. If they do not agree, advisees can communicate with their advisors further to work on the issues at hand.

References

Adams, H. G. (1992). Mentoring: An essential factor in the doctoral process for minority students. Notre Dame, IN: National Consortium for Graduate Degrees for Minority Students. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. ED358769).

Davis, L., Little, M. & Thornton, W. (1997). The art and angst of the mentoring relationship. Academic Psychiatry, 21, 61-71.

Golde, C. M. & Walker, G. (2006). (Eds.) Envisioning the future of doctoral education: Preparing stewards of the discipline. Carnegie essays on the doctorate. New York: Jossey-Bass.

Heinrich, K. T. (1995). Doctoral advisement relationship between women: On friendship and betrayal. The Journal of Higher Education, 66(4), 447-469.

How to Get the Mentoring You Want: A Guide for Graduate Students at a Diverse University © 2008 University of Michigan, The Rackham School of Graduate Studies The Regents of the University of Michigan.  A web version of this handbook can be obtained at: http://www.rackham.umich.edu/downloads/publications/mentoring.pdf

Johnson, W. B. & Huwe, J. M. (2003). Getting mentored in graduate school. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

Tuttle, K. N. (2000). Academic advising. New Directions for Higher Education, 111, 1524.

Walker, G., Golde, C., Jones, L., Bueschel, A., Hutchinson, P. (2008). The formation of scholars: Rethinking doctoral education for the twenty-first century. Stanford, CA: The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching.

Zhao, C., Golde, C. M., & McCormick, A.C. (2005, April). More than a signature: How advisor choice and advisor behavior affect doctoral student satisfaction. Paper presented at the meeting of the American Educational Research Association, Montreal, Canada.

From 2007-2009, Graduate Students in Education (GSE) and other graduate students in Master’s and Doctoral programs at UIC began the process of creating a document intended to provide academic advising guidelines. In 2008, the Doctoral Programs Steering Committee collaborated with the students to bring this document into its current form. 

The College of Education Doctoral Studies Core

As of Fall 2013, all College of Education PhD programs have adopted a core of doctoral studies program requirements that are common across all departments and concentrations. 

This core was instituted to incorporate learning objectives and elements of doctoral education that are common across the field of education, shared knowledge and values consistent with our College mission, and a stronger integration of theory, research design, methodology, and professional practice in research settings. COE faculty also believe that students benefit from learning with peers from all our doctoral programs because this helps them understand how and why education is a multidisciplinary field of study.  These changes were made after several years of fact-finding, discussion, and thought about how best to prepare doctoral students for the future *and* more closely align our PhD programs with the identity and overall mission of the College of Education.

 

Doctoral Studies Core Required Courses

Core courses, required of all COE PhD students regardless of program, include:

ED 504. Urban Contexts and Educational Research. This one-semester, 4 hour course prepares researchers with the foundational knowledge, both empirical and theoretical, for conducting inquiry into learners and learning, schools and schooling, families and communities in urban contexts.

ED 505. Introduction to Educational Research: Paradigms and Processes. This one-semester, 4 hour course introduces students to the purposes, history, basic processes, philosophies, paradigms and orientations (quantitative and qualitative), epistemological and ethical considerations, and audiences of educational research.

ED 506. Introduction to Educational Research: Designs and Analyses. This one-semester, 4 hour course includes an introduction to and analysis of different types of research designs, analyses, and related matters (e.g., validity, reliability, sampling) in the field of education.

 

College-Level Methodology Course Requirements

The following distributional requirements allow programs and students the necessary degree of flexibility in learning to use different research techniques to conduct original research. Students enroll in a major strand that focuses either on quantitative or qualitative analysis. If the major strand focuses on qualitative inquiry, at least one course should focus on statistical inquiry and methodology. Similarly, if the major strand focuses on statistical inquiry, at least one course should focus on qualitative inquiry.

Major Methodology Strand. At least 8 hours in a specific methodological area builds depth in students' knowledge of specific research methods.

Minor Methodology Strand. 4 hours focusing on research methods builds some breadth in students' methodological knowledge.

 

Common Program-Level Dimensions

These College-level goals and expectations are enacted in program-specific ways that but they are present in some form in all College of Education PhD programs.

Introduction to Doctoral Studies in Education. These professional development activities include at least one-semester of activities focused on common orienting and procedural knowledge and skills needed to succeed in doctoral education in the College of Education at UIC and to succeed in education as a scholarly field of study. Topics include: the meaning of scholarship and academic research; goals and expectations for doctoral education in education and in the College; the ethical dimension of academic work; reading and interpreting research; publication and peer review; and grant writing.

Academic and Professional Writing. This goal reflects programmatic means of teaching students the conventions of writing in research-focused prose that is acceptable for outlets in which they are likely to want to publish their work. Activities introduce students to writing for publication, conference presentations, and grant proposals, and to principles and practices of peer review. This may take the form of informal writing groups and/or asking students to build a portfolio of their writing products that are then evaluated in consultation with their advisor rather than formal coursework.

Professional Career Development in Education. Field and program-specific activities are planned to allow every doctoral student to work alongside a faculty member in teaching and research. Students shadow faculty to fully learn various aspects of the teaching and/or research crafts they hope to engage in once they complete their degree. This will not replace assistantships where students usually work on a funded project, but may involve research project hours where students engage in research that is aligned with their dissertation topic.

The specific courses and activities that fulfill these core requirements for the program into which you were admitted appear in Section III of this Handbook.

Overview of Doctoral Programs

Doctoral students in the College of Education are a diverse group and come from many different backgrounds.  Students have wide-ranging interests, and aspire to a variety of post-doctoral careers.  Our programs are designed to help you meet your individual needs and career goals.  All doctoral programs in the College of Education share high expectations for student learning and performance, are intellectually rigorous, and embody the highest standards of academic scholarship.

The College of Education offers four separate Ph.D. degree programs and several concentrations of study within them.  The four Ph.D. programs are (a) the Ph.D. in Education:  Curriculum and Instruction, (b) the Ph.D. in Education: Special Education, (c) the Ph.D. in Educational Psychology, and (d) the Ph.D. in Policy Studies in Urban Education.  The College of Education also offers an Ed.D. program for the preparation and development of school and system level leaders.

Each doctoral program in the College of Education requires that you complete a minimum of 96 semester hours of graduate work beyond the bachelor’s degree or minimum of 64 semester hours beyond the master’s degree.  Different programs require different numbers of hours beyond these minimums.  You can typically expect to take additional hours of coursework beyond the minimum specified by your degree program in order to meet your scholarly and professional goals.  According to Graduate College regulations, students entering with a master’s degree must complete all degree requirements within seven years of matriculation into their doctoral programs.  Those entering with a bachelor’s degree may take nine years to complete their requirements.  Program requirements may change at any time, at the discretion of the College, but you may always opt to adhere to the requirements in place when you entered the program.

You are considered to be in good standing in the Graduate College if you meet all of the following conditions:

  • Have removed any conditions of limited status placed on your admission.
  • Maintain a minimum Graduate Degree GPA of 3.00.
  • Make satisfactory progress toward completing degree requirements, including the dissertation or thesis.

A student who violates any of the continuation and probation rules specified in the UIC Graduate Catalog may be dropped at any time from the Graduate College, and thus the student’s degree program.  Violations include but are not limited to failure to fulfill conditions of limited status admission, a GPA of less than 3.0, failure to make satisfactory progress toward the completion of degree requirements, and failure to register for credit hours during the academic year (see the Graduate College website for the policy on leaves of absence:  http://grad.uic.edu/pdfs/form_leave_of_absence.pdf).  For more information about any of these policies, you should contact the College of Education Office of Student Services.

As noted above, it is important that you plan your program of study and select your courses in close consultation with your faculty program advisor.  Your program advisor will help you refine and develop your sense of direction through the program, and will recommend courses you should take to achieve scholarly and professional goals.  The program advisor will also help you identify a chair for your preliminary examination and dissertation or thesis committees.  You should consult with your advisor at least once each term.  You may change your faculty program advisor at any time during your program, provided both the current and prospective advisors agree to the change.  To change program advisors, you must complete a Change of Advisor Form.  This form may be obtained from the College of Education Office of Student Services. 

As a rule, you are governed by the requirements of the program and concentration as they are at the time you are admitted. If you are admitted to a program and concentration that is subsequently revised, you are obliged to fulfill the requirements of the program before its revision; you are not obliged to fulfill the new requirements.  Likewise, if you are admitted into a program that is replaced by a new program, you are obliged to fulfill the requirements of the program into which you were admitted, and not the program’s replacement.  Please note all program requirements listed in this handbook apply for students entering as of Fall 2013.  If you entered earlier than the Fall 2013 term, please consult the advising guides available on your program’s webpage, and speak with your advisor to confirm which requirements apply for your start date.

You may find that you would rather be part of a new or revised program and concentration than the program and concentration into which you were first admitted.  If this is the case, you may apply to transfer from the program and concentration into which you were admitted to the revised or new program and concentration.  When considering a transfer, you should discuss the various benefits and costs with your faculty program advisor, including how much of the work already completed will count toward completion of the new or revised program.  The program advisor will also be able to help you navigate the administrative process of transferring from one program and concentration to another.  The College of Education Office of Student Services has an application form for transfer that must be completed.  You need to obtain the signatures of the coordinator of the program and concentration from which you wish to transfer and the coordinator of the program and concentration into which you wish to transfer.  Depending on the program, you might also need to have a written recommendation from the coordinator of the program from which you wish to transfer.  You will need to satisfy the admissions requirements of the program and concentration into which you wish to transfer and, if the transfer is approved, you will need to meet all of the requirements of the new or revised program and concentration.  Transferring between programs and concentrations is not simply a formality.  For many programs and concentrations, program faculty review and approve transfer requests.  It is possible that a request might not be accepted by the faculty of the program and concentration into which you wish to transfer.

 

A Note about Independent Study

With the approval of the faculty program advisor and a faculty member who will supervise the work, you may take independent courses of study and count them as electives or area of specialization options in your doctoral program.  These studies can be important experiences in your doctoral work, allowing exploration of problems and topics of personal interest not addressed in depth in regular coursework.  Moreover, these studies can provide valuable opportunities to work with an individual faculty member more closely than is possible in a regular course.  In each program, there are limits to the number of independent study credit hours that you may count toward degree requirements.  You should be sure to consult with your faculty program advisor and the coordinator of the doctoral program for details.  

PhD in Curriculum and Instruction: Curriculum Studies

The Ph.D. in Education:  Curriculum and Instruction offers students opportunities to study in three major areas of concentration:  (a) Curriculum Studies; (b) Literacy, Language, and Culture; (c) Mathematics and Science Education.  Students in this Ph.D. program apply to and are admitted to one of these three concentrations.  These concentrations have some common elements but they also differ in a number of important ways.  Therefore, each of these concentrations is described separately.  You should refer to the description of the concentration to which you have been admitted.  You should also refer to later sections of this handbook that provide additional information about conducting dissertation research successfully. 

The concentration in Curriculum Studies emphasizes curriculum development, history, and theory, as well as cultural, philosophical, and practical issues in teaching and teacher education related to school subject matter such as mathematics, science, social studies, history, etc., as well as across subjects.  All students in this concentration are provided a strong background in research philosophy and methodology.  This area of study is currently referred to as curriculum studies, i.e., as designated by the name of Division B of the American Educational Research Association (AERA).

Overview of Requirements (Fall 2013)

This program concentration requires a minimum of 96 semester hours beyond the baccalaureate degree and a minimum of 64 semester hours beyond the master’s degree.  These requirements include completion of a 12-hour Doctoral Studies Core, 12-hour methodology requirement, and 12 hours of dissertation research.  Students are required to pass written and oral portions of a preliminary examination and successfully defend their dissertation research.  This concentration’s requirements are as follows for students who enter the program with an earned master’s degree. 

  • COE Doctoral Studies Core—12 hours
  • Methodology Requirement --- 12 hours
  • Curriculum Studies Program Core—24 hours (minimum)
  • Teaching Apprenticeship, Research Project, or Independent Study --- 4 hours
  • Preliminary Examination—Written Portion
  • Preparation of a Dissertation Research Proposal
  • Preliminary Examination—Oral Portion
  • Dissertation Research—12 hours (minimum)
  • Dissertation Defense

Students who enter with a bachelor’s degree but not a master’s degree must take up to 32 hours of additional course work (the equivalent of a master’s degree) in an area of specialization.

 

Doctoral Studies Core (12 hours)

All doctoral degrees in the College of Education require a core of courses that focuses on different types of research in educational settings, research design, and the analysis of educational data.  These core courses will help you develop the minimum skills needed to evaluate research literature and to begin your own independent research.  You are encouraged to take these core courses early in your program; however, you may take other courses in the program before completing this set of courses. 

The requirements of the Doctoral Studies Core are:

  • ED 504—Urban Contexts and Educational Research (4 hours)
  • ED 505—Introduction to Educational Research: Paradigms and Processes (4 hours)
  • ED 506—Introduction to Educational Research: Designs and Analyses (4 hours)
Methodology Requirement (12 hours)

In addition to the Doctoral Studies Core above, you must take a minimum of three research methodology courses as described below.  Note also that you may choose or be encouraged by your faculty advisor to take additional courses in research methodology beyond these minimums in order to meet your personal scholarly and professional goals.

The Methodology Requirement includes:

  • ED 502—Essentials of Qualitative Inquiry in Education (4 hours)
  • ED 503/EPSY 503—Essentials of Quantitative Inquiry in Education (4 hours)
  • A third methodology course selected in consultation with your advisor (4 hours)
Concentration Program Core (24 hours minimum)

Students who study in the concentration in Curriculum Studies typically pursue a wide range of professional and personal objectives.  For this reason, the choice of courses in the area of concentration is left largely up to you, in consultation with your faculty advisor, to allow you to develop your own individualized program of study.  All students in this program are required to take two courses:  (a) CI 500—Proseminar in Curriculum and Instruction; and (b) CI 574—Foundations of Curriculum Studies.  CI 500 is designed to help you meet faculty members and be introduced to the wide range of research approaches used in the field of curriculum studies.  CI 574 provides an overview of the conceptual foundations of curriculum studies.  CI 500 may be repeated once for credit.

While no other specific courses are required, all students in this Ph.D. concentration are expected to develop a strong background in curriculum and instruction and an emphasis on a particular area of study.  Such emphases might include curriculum theory; curriculum development; research on teaching; bilingual education; a subject matter specialty such as social studies education; teacher education; curriculum history; education in non-school settings; and issues of equity and justice vis-à-vis curriculum and instruction.  To meet individual scholarly and professional goals, you may need to take more than the minimum 24 semester hours of coursework in your particular area of specialization. 

Although you may take all your courses in the College of Education, you are strongly encouraged to take courses in other UIC colleges and departments. Taking courses outside the College of Education can help you develop a broader range of conceptual and methodological tools for your own research interests, and allows you to work with a broader range of faculty members. 

Teaching Apprenticeship, Research Project, or Independent Study (CI 592, 593, or 596, 4 hours)

You should complete at least 4 hours from among the following options:

Teaching Apprenticeship (CI 592)

An apprenticeship in teaching is strongly recommended for those individuals intending to pursue a career in higher education.  The apprenticeship in teaching requires that you register for CI 592—Apprenticeship in Teacher Education and co-teach a university course under the direction of a faculty sponsor.  The course that you teach should be related to your interests and future career objectives.  A faculty member will be the instructor of record and will supervise you closely throughout the internship.  You will assume responsibility for course instruction, student interaction, and evaluation to the extent negotiated with the instructor.  In addition to this apprenticeship in teaching, you are also encouraged to seek opportunities to deliver guest lectures in other classes offered by the faculty.

Research Project (CI 593)

The research project is an important beginning experience in doing research on actual problems in a chosen area of study.  The research project may also give you an opportunity to explore and pilot ideas for your dissertation research.  You may seek out program faculty to collaborate on a research project with you and perhaps with other doctoral students.  Ideally, you would work on such projects with faculty as full research colleagues and be involved in all aspects of the project from design through execution, analysis, and writing of results.  Such work may lead to a presentation at a scholarly conference or to submission of a manuscript to a professional journal or other publication (such as a book chapter or reference book article).  (See Section V on the possible need for IRB approval of a proposed research project.)

You should consult with your faculty advisor to determine when you are ready to embark on a research project.  You must then find a faculty member to help design and conduct the project.  This faculty member may be your program advisor or another faculty member who will bring particular expertise and experience to support the project. 

Independent Study (CI 596)

In consultation with your advisor, and with the agreement and approval of a supervising faculty member, you may choose to register for an Independent Study (CI 596) project.   This option allows you to design, implement and analyze the results of a research problem in your area of specialization.

Annual Reviews

You are required to submit a formal progress report each year.  These reports provide you with an opportunity to reflect on whether you are meeting your goals while allowing faculty to assess whether adequate progress is being made.  Program faculty review and discuss these reports and provide written feedback to you about whether you are meeting expectations.  Recommendations for ways to enhance or sustain your progress are a likely result of this process.  If you are not making adequate progress you may be placed on probation and given directive feedback on how to proceed.

Preliminary Examination

The purpose of the preliminary examination is to determine your readiness to undertake dissertation research.  The examination has two parts—a written portion that focuses primarily on your program of study, and an oral portion that focuses primarily on your dissertation proposal.  Both portions are evaluated by a preliminary examination committee.  Passing the preliminary examination constitutes formal admission to candidacy for the Ph.D.

The written portion of the preliminary examination should be taken when you have completed most, though not necessarily all, of your coursework.  The oral portion of the exam should be taken when you have completed your dissertation proposal.  You must take and pass the oral portion of the exam before you can begin dissertation research.  Before beginning dissertation research, you must also receive approval from the Institutional Review Board (IRB) if the research involves human subjects (see Section V).

Forming a Preliminary Examination Committee

You should begin making arrangements to take the preliminary examination when you have almost finished regular coursework.  First, you must find a faculty member to chair your preliminary examination committee.  Your faculty program advisor can help with this task.  The program advisor may serve as a your committee chair, or you may identify another faculty member in the Curriculum and Instruction Department whose interests and expertise align more closely with your program of study and dissertation research.  You should work with the committee chair to identify and recruit at least four other members to serve on the examination committee.  At least three members, including the chair, must be UIC faculty who are full members of the Graduate College.  Tenured or tenure-track faculty are usually full members of the Graduate College; clinical and visiting faculty generally are not.  Links to listing of full members are available on the Graduate College website: http://grad.uic.edu/cms/?pid=1000207.  At least two committee members must be tenured faculty in the College of Education (i.e., associate professors or full professors).  Also, at least two members (in addition to the chair) must be in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction.  The Graduate College does not require that the preliminary examination committee include a member from outside the Department of Curriculum and Instruction.  However, since the Graduate College requires that dissertation committees have a member from outside the Program (see Section IV), and since the preliminary examination committee often forms the basis of the future dissertation committee, you may want to ask an outside member to be on the preliminary examination committee as well.

In order to formally constitute the preliminary examination committee, you must submit to the Graduate College a Committee Recommendation Form.  This form may be obtained from the Graduate College’s website: http://grad.uic.edu/cms/?pid=1000329.    At the same time, you should ask the Office of Student Services (3145 ETMSW) for a degree checklist (see Section IV).  A list of the courses taken is available through the my.UIC portal: https://my.uic.edu/common/ . You must return the completed degree checklist with the signed Committee Recommendation Form to the Office of Student Services.  The completed form must be signed by the committee chairperson and submitted to the Office of Student Services at least three weeks before the date of the examination.  Before submitting this form, you must be sure that the faculty members identified to serve on the committee have agreed to serve.  If you want to include a committee member who is not on the faculty at UIC or is not a member of the UIC Graduate College, the Graduate College must approve that member.  This approval process is initiated when the Committee Recommendation Form is submitted to the Office of Student Services.  A copy of the potential committee member’s full current curriculum vitae must be submitted with the Committee Recommendation Form.

Written Portion of the Exam

The chairperson of the preliminary examination committee will convene at least two other committee members (one of whom must be in the Curriculum and Instruction Department) to develop questions for the written portion of the exam.  Generally, questions in the written portion of the exam ask you to integrate and apply knowledge and understandings gained from your coursework, research projects, and independent readings.  You may choose to take the written portion of the exam at the university or as a take-home assignment.  You must pass the written portion of the exam to take the oral portion of the exam, which focuses primarily on the dissertation proposal.  After you have passed the written portion of the exam, the chair will submit a form indicating this accomplishment to the Office of Student Services for inclusion in your file.

Preparing a Dissertation Proposal

Your coursework, research project, and independent readings should give you a good start on planning for dissertation research.  Perhaps you will have decided on a topic, conducted a relevant review of literature, or carried out a pilot study before taking the written portion of the preliminary examination.  Indeed, the written portion of the exam may help develop further your ideas for your dissertation research.  Nevertheless, after passing the written portion of the preliminary examination, you must complete the proposal for dissertation research and prepare for the oral portion of the preliminary examination.

Dissertation research may be developed from the many possibilities related to your area of study and from a variety of research traditions.  The process of writing a dissertation proposal is challenging, but it provides great opportunities for creative and personally rewarding work.  Students often find it helpful to draw on their studies to date and avail themselves of the advice and support of their committee chair and members, other faculty, and fellow students whenever possible. Dissertation proposals may take many forms and be of varying lengths.  The organization, content, and length of the proposal are issues that you should decide in consultation with the chair of your preliminary examination committee. 

When you and the committee chair agree that the dissertation proposal is ready for review and approval, you will work with the chair to distribute the proposal to members of the preliminary examination committee and schedule the oral portion of the preliminary exam.  The proposal should be distributed to committee members for review at least three weeks before the scheduled exam date.  It is strongly recommended a draft of the IRB application is included in the proposal.  As a rule, you should not submit your application to the IRB before the oral portion of the examination is completed, because committees may make recommendations for changing research protocols during the exam.  (See Section V for information about IRB requirements and procedures.)

Oral Portion of the Exam

The oral portion of the preliminary exam is primarily a hearing on the dissertation proposal, although it may also address aspects of the written portion of the exam.  The oral portion of the exam must be taken and passed before dissertation research can begin.  A primary function of the oral portion of the exam is committee approval of the dissertation research proposal. 

Evaluation of the Preliminary Exam

Both written and oral portions of the preliminary examination are evaluated on a pass-fail basis.  If two or more members of the preliminary examination committee assign afailing grade to the exam, the student fails that portion.  If necessary, the entire portion of the exam or some element of that portion can be retaken once.  Students who fail the oral portion of the exam are sometimes asked to do additional work on or to revise their dissertation proposal before their committee gives final approval.  Even if a committee does not fail a student on the oral portion of the exam, it may require that the student make particular changes in the dissertation proposal before the proposal is approved.

Passing the oral portion of the preliminary exam signifies that committee members have given their approval for you to carry out your proposed dissertation research.  Once you have reached this point, you must submit the final version of the IRB application for approval (see Section V).  Before an application is submitted to the IRB, you must have it reviewed and signed by the committee chair and the chair of the Curriculum and Instruction Department. 

Dissertation Research (CI 599, 12 hours minimum)

After passing the oral portion of the preliminary examination and receiving approval from the IRB, you may begin dissertation research.  You must register for a minimum of 12 hours of dissertation credit during the time you conduct and write up your study.  After registering for the minimum of 12 hours of dissertation credit, if you have passed both the written and oral portions of the preliminary exam, you may petition the Graduate College to be permitted to register for 0 (zero) hours of dissertation credit.  If permission is granted, you may continue to register for 0 hours if you continue to make satisfactory progress and are within the time limits for completion of the degree.  Note that even if you are eligible and successfully petition the Graduate College to register for 0 hours, you still must register for 0 hours each semester until you have successfully defended the dissertation (although you do not need to register for 0 credits for the summer session unless the defense will be held during the summer).

The Graduate College makes an exception to the above registration requirement if the defense will occur during the late registration period for a term; in those cases, a doctoral defense will be allowed without student registration in that term.  This is assuming that you were registered the previous term, or the previous spring term in the instance of a fall defense (which should be the case since, as stated above, continuous registration is required).  The late registration period is the official first ten days of any fall or spring semester and the first five days of the summer term.  If you defend after the 10th day (5th in summer) you must be registered.

If you hold a fellowship, assistantship and/or tuition waiver, and do not resign from it, then registration is mandatory for the number of hours required to hold the award or assistantship.  If you hold a student visa, you probably do not have to register if you leave the country by the 10th day (5th in summer), although this should be verified with Office of International Services.

This (late period registration defense) exception does not affect the registration requirement to take the Preliminary Examination, or the general requirement of continuous registration from Preliminary Examination to defense.  Failure to register continuously may result in being administratively dropped from the program.  You should refer to Section IV for important additional information about constituting a dissertation committee and conducting dissertation research. 

Dissertation Defense

When nearing the end of dissertation research, you should begin to plan your dissertation defense with your dissertation committee chair.  See Section IV for specific information about organizing and scheduling a dissertation defense and filing all the paperwork required before the defense can be conducted.

According to Graduate College regulations, at least one year must pass between completing the oral portion of the preliminary examination and the dissertation defense.  Any student who fails to complete all program requirements, including the dissertation defense, within five years of passing the oral portion of the preliminary examination must retake the preliminary examination.

 

PhD in Curriculum and Instruction: Literacy, Language, and Culture

The Ph.D. in Education:  Curriculum and Instruction offers students opportunities to study in three major areas of concentration:  (a) Curriculum Studies; (b) Literacy, Language, and Culture; (c) Mathematics and Science Education.  Students in this Ph.D. program apply to and are admitted to one of these three concentrations.  These concentrations have some common elements but they also differ in a number of important ways.  Therefore, each of these concentrations is described separately.  You should refer to the description of the concentration to which you have been admitted.  You should also refer to later sections of this handbook that provide additional information about conducting dissertation research successfully. 

The Ph.D. concentration in Literacy, Language, and Culture prepares students to conduct research on literacy and literacy instruction with children, adolescents, and adults in culturally and linguistically diverse urban settings.  Integral to our research on the processes of reading and writing is inquiry focusing on:

  • the stakeholders of literacy development & instruction (i.e., students, teachers, parents, and policy makers)
  • the technologies of literacy - both conventional (e.g., books) and new (e.g., web-based)
  • the purposes to which literacies are put (e.g., educative, functional, aesthetic, critical)
  • the multiple in- and out-of-school contexts in which various literacies are practiced (e.g., the family, community, workplace).

Students who successfully complete the Ph.D. with a concentration in Literacy, Language, and Culture are prepared to assume research positions in colleges and universities, state and local educational research agencies, and various R & D settings in the private sector.

Progressing Through the Program

Upon admission into the LLC doctoral program you are assigned a temporary advisor who serves in that capacity until you choose a person to chair your program committee by the end of the first year of studies.  You, in concert with this chairperson, will select a minimum of two additional faculty members who together will constitute your doctoral program committee.  Your doctoral program committee serves four major functions:

1.Designs a course of studies compatible with both the LLC program and your specific professional goals.

2.Provides guidance regarding the experiences and deliverables that will best prepare you for entry into the profession.  Your Doctoral Portfolio (detailed below) serves an important function in creating a “roadmap” of both in- and out-of-course activities and products.

3.Writes and evaluates questions comprising the “specialization” component of the qualifying exam taken toward the end of your coursework (See the LLC specialization and qualifying examination information discussed below).

4.Oversees and provides feedback in an annual review of your progress.

Toward the end of formal coursework and upon successful completion of the qualifying examination you will choose a chairperson and committee to direct your preliminary examination (see details below).  The exam consists of both a written component and an oral component.  The written component of the preliminary examination is your dissertation proposal and the oral part is the oral defense of the proposal.  Successful completion of both components of the preliminary examination constitutes formal admission to candidacy for the doctoral degree.  From this point forward in your program the prelim committee members serve as members of your dissertation committee through the final defense of the completed dissertation.

Overview of Requirements (Fall 2013)

The LLC program concentration requires a minimum of 96 semester hours beyond the baccalaureate degree or, depending on the focus and quality of your master’s degree program, a minimum of 64 semester hours beyond the master’s degree.  Specifically, this includes a 12-hour Doctoral Studies core; a 12-hour methodology requirement; a Literacy, Language, and Culture Concentration Program Core consisting of  8 hours in required courses plus 12 to 44 hours of “selective” and elective courses appropriate to your area of specialization (depending on whether or not you enter the program with an approved master’s degree); a 4-hour research project; and a minimum of 16 hours of dissertation research.  Your doctoral program committee determines final decisions concerning specific courses and the number of semester hours required if entering with a master’s degree.

Doctoral Studies Core (12 hours)

All doctoral degrees in the College of Education require a core of courses that focuses on different types of research in educational settings, research design, and the analysis of educational data.  These core courses will help you develop the minimum skills needed to evaluate research literature and to begin your own independent research.  You are encouraged to take these core courses early in your program; however, you may take other courses in the program before completing this set of courses. 

The requirements of the Doctoral Studies Core are:

  • ED 504—Urban Contexts and Educational Research (4 hours)
  • ED 505—Introduction to Educational Research: Paradigms and Processes (4 hours)
  • ED 506—Introduction to Educational Research: Designs and Analyses (4 hours)
Methodology Requirement (12 hours)

In addition to the Doctoral Studies Core above, you must take a minimum of three research methodology courses as described below.  Note also that you may choose or be encouraged by your faculty advisor to take additional courses in research methodology beyond these minimums in order to meet your personal scholarly and professional goals.

The Methodology Requirement includes:

  • ED 502—Essentials of Qualitative Inquiry in Education (4 hours)
  • ED 503/EPSY 503—Essentials of Quantitative Inquiry in Education (4 hours)
  • A third methodology course selected in consultation with your advisor (4 hours)
Literacy, Language, and Culture Concentration Program Core (20 hours minimum)
Required First-Year Sequence (8 hours)

When entering the Ph.D. program with a concentration in Literacy, Language, and Culture you are required to take the yearlong sequence of two courses Proseminar in Literacy, Language, and Culture during the first year of your program.

  • CI 556 – Proseminar in Literacy, Language, and Culture I (4)
  • CI 557 -- Proseminar in Literacy, Language, and Culture II (4)
Literacy, Language, and Culture Selectives (12 hours minimum)

The LLC concentration requires completion of between 12 and 44 hours of selective and elective courses depending on whether you have completed a masters’ degree approved by the program faculty. Students with a master’s degree that is not approved and students with only a baccalaureate degree are required to take 12 hours of selectives listed below and 32 additional hours of elective courses

Students with approved masters’ degrees are required to take a combination of the selectives listed below.  Selectives are focused seminars taught by LLC faculty in their respective areas of specialization.  Literacy, Language, and Culture selectives include:

  • CI 558 --The Historical and Philosophical Bases of Literacy and Literacy Instruction (4)
  • CI 559 --The Social and Cultural Contexts of Literacy and Literacy Instruction (4)
  • CI 561 -- Genre Theory and Practices (4)
  • CI 562 -- Design and Conduct of Literacy Research (4)
  • CI 563 -- Analysis of Research in Literacy (4)
  • CI 568 -- Research in Children’s and Adolescent Literature (4)
  • CI 577 -- Literacy In and Out of School (4)
  • CI 579 -- Bi-literacy: Theory, Research, and Practice (4)
  • CI 581 -- Perspectives on Reading: Theory, Research and Practice (4)
  • CI 582 -- Research Perspectives on Literacy in the Disciplines (4)
  • CI 583 -- Early Literacy: Theory, Research, and Practice (4)
  • CI 584 -- Semiotics, Literacy, and Learning (4)
  • CI 585 -- Seminar in Literacy Studies (4)
  • CI 586 -- Perspectives on Writing Instruction: Theory, Research, and Practice (4)
  • CI 587 -- Literacy Assessment:  Theory, Research, and Practice (4)
  • CI 588 -- Design Research in the Study of Literacy (4)
  • CI 589 -- Literacy and Learning Technologies: Theory, Research and Practice (4)
  • CI 592 -- Apprenticeship in Teacher Education (1 – 4)
Electives (0-32 hours)

Elective courses may be taken university-wide and as part of the Chicago Metropolitan Exchange Program. (See: http://grad.uic.edu/cms/?pid=1000979).

Annual Reviews

Graduate College policy requires doctoral programs to conduct an annual assessment of their doctoral students.  To effectively monitor your progress and to provide a vehicle through which you and your faculty advisor can reflect on your progress in a structured way, you are required to prepare and submit a formal review of progress each year.  Your progress is assessed on the basis of two sets of criteria: 1) the quality of performance in coursework and on other LLC benchmarks (see LLC Doctoral Portfolio Activities below), and 2) progress in completing coursework and other program benchmarks (i.e., research project, qualifying exams, dissertation) in a timely manner.  At the end of each academic year you prepare a brief (1-2 pg.) narrative summary of progress for that year.  The LLC faculty review and discuss your summary along with other supporting documentation and then provide feedback regarding your progress in the program.   It is the responsibility of your doctoral program chair (or temporary advisor) to provide a prompt written summary of these proceedings and meet with you to discuss your performance.
 

LLC Doctoral Portfolio Activities

 

 

Core

Optional1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Research & Inquiry

Publishable2 quality critical review of literature

Design research of educational environments

Literacy position paper

Evaluation of literacy-related program

Publishable2 quality review of literacy-related book

Grant proposal (individual or collaborative)

Review of journal manuscript

Fellowship proposal

Doctoral research project/IRB proposal

 

Publishable2 quality paper for a professional journal

 

Dissertation proposal/IRB

 

Presentation of research at national conference

 

 

 

 

Teaching

 

Lead Literacy Matters discussion of article, chapter, etc.

Mentoring beginning level doctoral student

Development & justification of a detailed course syllabus

Professional development in educational contexts

(Co)-teaching (undergraduate and/or masters-level) literacy-related course

 

 

 

 

 

Professional Leadership

Membership in literacy organizations

Publishable2 quality review of literacy curriculum

 

Design, implementation, and evaluation of curriculum

 

Participation on school, district, and/or state committees, panels, etc.

 

Membership on professional committees

 

Peer review of conference proposals

 

 

Cross-cutting Intellectual Activities

Collection of representative papers

Preliminary examination (individualized component)

Preliminary examination

Development of personal home page

Annual letter summarizing progress

 

Development and ongoing revision of curriculum vitae

 

Statement of teaching philosophy

 

Statement of 5 year research plan

 

Job talk (LM)

 

1Note that by definition “negotiated portfolio activities” may be individualized and thus open-ended in nature.

“Publishable” in the present context means that your doctoral committee evaluates a text to be of publishable quality.

 

Teaching Apprenticeship

An apprenticeship in teaching is strongly recommended for those individuals intending to pursue a career in higher education.  The apprenticeship in teaching requires that you register for CI 592—Apprenticeship in Teacher Education and co-teach a university course under the direction of a faculty sponsor.  The course that you teach should be related to your interests and future career objectives.  A faculty member will be the instructor of record and will supervise you closely throughout the internship.  You will assume responsibility for course instruction, student interaction, and evaluation to the extent negotiated with the instructor.  In addition to this apprenticeship in teaching, you are also encouraged to seek opportunities to deliver guest lectures in other classes offered by the Literacy, Language, and Culture faculty.

Ph.D. Research Project (CI 593 - 4 semester hours)

The research project is an important beginning experience in conducting research on actual problems in your chosen area of study.  The research project may also give you an opportunity to explore and pilot ideas for your dissertation research.  All students specializing in Literacy, Language, and Culture conduct a research project in collaboration with an LLC faculty member or a team of faculty members and students. You are required to receive IRB approval of a proposed research project before beginning the data collection process. You will make a formal presentation, oral, and/or written, of the project findings. You are encouraged to use this work as a basis for a manuscript to be submitted for a scholarly conference presentation and/or a publication. 

The LLC Qualifying Examination

The qualifying examination serves as the first step in determining your readiness to undertake dissertation research.  It is administered at or near the end of the time you have completed most of your course work (but have not yet made a major investment toward your dissertation research).  Only students in good academic standing are permitted to take the examination.

The qualifying exam in Literacy, Language, and Culture is offered semi-annually, once prior to the beginning of the academic year and once during spring semester.  It is designed to be educative as well as evaluative.  The exam consists of two components: a Common Knowledge Component given to all students seeking doctoral candidacy and a Specialization Component focusing on your area of specific inquiry in literacy.  The qualifying exam is taken over a four-day period, with three days devoted to the common component and one day to the specialization component.

The Common Knowledge Component consists of three integrative essay questions that assess the breadth of your knowledge in Literacy, Language, and Culture, knowledge that the LLC faculty believes any doctoral candidate, regardless of area of specialization, should be able to demonstrate. This knowledge is not confined to that acquired through coursework.  Members of the LLC faculty identify major areas as well as seminal texts that delineate the reach of this common knowledge.  The LLC Qualifying Exam Committee, consisting of three LLC faculty members, creates questions that are then reviewed by the entire LLC faculty.  You will receive these questions and have 72 hours to complete your answers.  You will do so with the full benefit of whatever textual resources you have at hand.  Although students are free to work collaboratively in preparation for the qualifying exam, once presented with the actual exam questions, you will answer the questions without the benefit of any human interaction (including face-to-face, electronic, and other forms).  You will sign an honor statement acknowledging your agreement to these terms.

The Specialization Component consists of questions created and graded by your doctoral program committee and is designed to evaluate your knowledge relative to your area of specialization. Your doctoral program committee determines the number of questions comprising the Specialization Component.  To insure equity, the LLC Qualifying Exam Committee reviews these questions.  You have 24 hours to complete the Specialization Component and are to abide by the same honor system described above for the Common Knowledge Component.

Members of the LLC Qualifying Exam Committee assess your answers to the Common Knowledge Component of the exam, and members of your doctoral program committee assess your answer(s) to the Specialization Component.  A grade of "pass" or "fail" Is assigned to each component. Upon unanimous agreement of committee members, you may “pass with distinction.” Both components must be passed in order to pass the qualifying examination.  Each component of your examination cannot be passed with more than one "fail" vote from the committee members.  The committee may require that specific conditions be met before the "pass" recommendation becomes effective.  On the recommendation of the committee, the head or chair may permit a second examination if you do not pass the first exam.  A third examination is not permitted.

The LLC Preliminary Exam (i.e., Defense of Dissertation Proposal)

Upon successful completion of the Qualifying Exam you should ask the Office of Student Services (3145 ETMSW) for a degree checklist.  A list of the courses taken is available through the my.UIC portal: https://my.uic.edu/common/. You must return the completed degree checklist with the signed Committee Recommendation Form to the Office of Student Services.  The completed form must be signed by your committee chairperson and submitted to the Office of Student Services at least three weeks before the date of your examination.

Once you have successfully passed your Qualifying Exam you should choose a member of the LLC faculty to chair your preliminary examination committee.  The preliminary exam committee will consist of five members, at least three of whom must be UIC graduate faculty with full membership, two must be tenured, and two (2) must come from the Literacy, Language, and Culture faculty.  Your doctoral program chair may serve as a chair of your preliminary committee, or you may identify another LLC faculty member whose interests and expertise align more closely with your program of study and dissertation research.  The chair of the committee must be both a member of the LLC faculty and a full member of the graduate faculty.  You should work with your chair to identify and recruit the remaining four other members to serve on the examination committee.  The committee for the preliminary exam is appointed by the Dean of the Graduate College upon receipt of the Committee Recommendation Form. This form may be obtained from the Graduate College’s website: http://grad.uic.edu/pdfs/CommRecForm.pdf .    

The purpose of the preliminary examination is to determine your readiness to undertake the dissertation; passing it constitutes formal Admission to Candidacy.  The examination serves as the last major step toward the Ph.D. degree except for the completion and defense of the dissertation. The preliminary exam consists of a written and an oral component.  The written component of the preliminary exam is your formal dissertation proposal; the oral component is the oral defense of this written proposal.

Each member of the examining committee assigns a grade of “pass” or “fail” based on your performance on both the written proposal and the oral defense of the proposal.  You cannot be passed with more than one “fail” vote. The committee may require that specific conditions be met before the “pass” recommendation becomes effective. On the recommendation of the committee, the head or chair may permit a second examination.  A third examination is not permitted.  The results of the examination must be submitted to the Graduate College within two (2) weeks of the completion of the exam.  Once you have passed the examination, the dean of the Graduate College will notify you that you have been admitted to candidacy.

Dissertation Research (CI 599, 16 hours minimum)

Successful completion of the dissertation is the penultimate experience in your doctoral program.  The dissertation is based on original research and involves both a formal presentation of the proposed research and a final oral defense of the written dissertation.  You may begin your dissertation research upon successful completion of the oral portion of the preliminary examination and receiving approval from the IRB.  You must register for a minimum of 16 hours of dissertation credit during the time that the study is conducted and written up.  Having registered for the minimum of 16 hours of dissertation credit and passed both written and oral portions of the preliminary examination, you may petition the Graduate College to be permitted to register for 0 (zero) hours of dissertation credit.  If permission is granted, you may continue to register for 0 hours if you continue to make satisfactory progress and are within the time limits for completion of the degree.  Note that even if you are eligible and successfully petition the Graduate College to register for 0 hours, you still must register for 0 hours each semester until you have successfully defended the dissertation (although you do not need to register for 0 credits for the summer session unless the defense will be held during the summer).

The Graduate College makes an exception to the above registration requirement if the defense will occur during the late registration period for a term; in those cases, a doctoral defense will be allowed without student registration in that term.  This is assuming that you were registered the previous term, or the previous spring term in the instance of a fall defense (which should be the case since, as stated above, continuous registration is required).  The late registration period is the official first ten days of any fall or spring semester and the first five days of the summer term.  If you defend after the 10th day (5th in summer) you must be registered.

If you hold a fellowship, assistantship and/or tuition waiver, and do not resign from it, then registration is mandatory for the number of hours required to hold the award or assistantship.  If you hold a student visa, you probably do not have to register if you leave the country by the 10th day (5th in summer), although this should be verified with Office of International Services.

This (late period registration defense) exception does not affect the registration requirement to take the Preliminary Examination, or the general requirement of continuous registration from Preliminary Examination to defense.  Failure to register continuously may result in being administratively dropped from the program.  You should refer to Section IV for important additional information about constituting a dissertation committee and conducting dissertation research. 

Dissertation Defense

When nearing the end of dissertation research, you should begin to plan your dissertation defense with your dissertation committee chair.  See Section IV of this handbook for specific information about organizing and scheduling a dissertation defense and filing all the paperwork required before the defense can be conducted.

According to Graduate College regulations, at least one year must pass between completing the oral portion of the preliminary examination and the dissertation defense.  Any student who fails to complete all program requirements, including the dissertation defense, within five years of passing the oral portion of the preliminary examination must retake the preliminary examination.

PhD in Curriculum and Instruction: Mathematics and Science Education (MSE)

The Ph.D. in Education:  Curriculum and Instruction offers students opportunities to study in three major areas of concentration:  (a) Curriculum Studies; (b) Literacy, Language, and Culture; (c) Mathematics and Science Education.  Students in this Ph.D. program apply to and are admitted to one of these three concentrations.  These concentrations have some common elements but they also differ in a number of important ways.  Therefore, each of these concentrations is described separately.  You should refer to the description of the concentration to which you have been admitted.  You should also refer to later sections of this handbook that provide additional information about conducting dissertation research successfully. 

The MSE PhD program spans P-20 mathematics and science education in urban settings in and out of schools. The focus is on developing new knowledge that improves science and mathematics education and has an impact on the communities we serve. Students engage in coursework and research experiences that guide them to view issues of learning, teaching, curriculum, assessment, and policy through sociocultural and sociopolitical lenses where equity, social justice, race, language, culture, and identity are essential considerations.

Program faculty members are widely recognized as leaders in their respective fields. They have published extensively on the educational experiences of African American and Latino learners, and bring to their research and teaching strong disciplinary education in STEM fields. They also have considerable records of mentoring and preparing scholars from traditionally underrepresented groups, as well as preparing and collaborating with P-20 science and mathematics teachers and faculty.  

Graduates of the MSE program are well prepared to assume a variety of positions in colleges, universities, organizations, and informal educational settings to improve the mathematics and science education of children, adolescents, and adult learners through research.

Overview of Requirements (Fall 2013)

The program requires a minimum of 98 semester hours beyond the baccalaureate degree and a minimum of 66 semester hours beyond the master’s degree.  These requirements include completion of a 12-hour Doctoral Studies Core, a 12-hour methodology requirement, 12 hours of the MSE program core, and 12 hours in one of the two disciplinary strands (i.e., mathematics education or science education). Students are required to pass written and oral portions of a preliminary examination and successfully defend their dissertation research.  Requirements are as follows for students who enter the program with an earned master’s degree. 

  • COE Doctoral Studies Core –12 hours
  • Methodology Requirement – 12 hours
  • Mathematics and Science Education Program Core – 12 hours
  • Proseminar in Curriculum and Instruction – 2 hours
  • Mathematics or Science Education Specialization – 12 hours
  • Teaching Apprenticeship, Research Project, or Independent Study – 4 hours
  • Preliminary Examination – Written Portion
  • Preparation of a Dissertation Research Proposal
  • Preliminary Examination – Oral Portion
  • Dissertation Research – 12 hours (minimum)
  • Dissertation Defense

Students who enter with a bachelor’s but not a master’s degree must take up to 32 hours of additional course work (the equivalent of a master’s degree) in an area of specialization.

Doctoral Studies Core (12 hours)

All doctoral degrees in the College of Education require a core of courses that focuses on different types of research in educational settings, research design, and the analysis of educational data.  These core courses will help you develop the minimum skills needed to evaluate research literature and to begin your own independent research.  You are encouraged to take these core courses early in your program; however, you may take other courses in the program before completing this set of courses. 

The requirements of the Doctoral Studies Core are:

  • ED 504—Urban Contexts and Educational Research (4 hours)
  • ED 505—Introduction to Educational Research: Paradigms and Processes (4 hours)
  • ED 506—Introduction to Educational Research: Designs and Analyses (4 hours)
Methodology Requirement (12 hours)

In addition to the Doctoral Studies Core above, you must take a minimum of three research methodology courses as described below.  Note also that you may choose or be encouraged by your faculty advisor to take additional courses in research methodology beyond these minimums in order to meet your personal scholarly and professional goals.

The Methodology Requirement includes:

  • ED 502—Essentials of Qualitative Inquiry in Education (4 hours)
  • ED 503/EPSY 503—Essentials of Quantitative Inquiry in Education (4 hours)
  • A third methodology course selected in consultation with your advisor (4 hours)
Math and Science Concentration Program Core (12 hours)
  • CI 517 – The Sociopolitcal Context of Mathematics and Science Education (4 hours)
  • CI 518 – Race, Identity, and Agency in Mathematics and Science Education (4 hours)
  • CI 573 – Multimodality, Multiliteracies, & Science and Mathematics Education (4 hrs)
Proseminar in Curriculum and Instruction (CI 500, 2 hours)

CI 500 is designed to help you meet faculty members and be introduced to the wide range of research approaches used in the field of curriculum studies in general, including mathematics and science education.

Mathematics or Science Education Specialization (12 hours – Choose 3 Courses)
  • CI 516 – Research on Mathematics Teachers and Teaching (4 hours)
  • CI 519 -- Research on the Learning of Mathematics (4 hours)
  • CI 520 – The K-12 Mathematics Curriculum: Theory, Politics, and Reform (4 hrs)
  • CI 566 – Research on Science Curriculum (4 hours)
  • CI 567 – Research on Science Teaching and Teacher Education (4 hours)
  • CI 570 – Research on Science Learning (4 hours)
Teaching Apprenticeship, Research Project, or Independent Study (CI 592, 593, or 596, 4 hours)

You should complete at least 4 hours from among the following options:

Teaching Apprenticeship (CI 592)

An apprenticeship in teaching is strongly recommended for those individuals intending to pursue a career in higher education.  The apprenticeship in teaching requires that you register for CI 592—Apprenticeship in Teacher Education and co-teach a university course under the direction of a faculty sponsor.  The course that you teach should be related to your interests and future career objectives.  A faculty member will be the instructor of record and will supervise you closely throughout the internship.  You will assume responsibility for course instruction, student interaction, and evaluation to the extent negotiated with the instructor.  In addition to this apprenticeship in teaching, you are also encouraged to seek opportunities to deliver guest lectures in other classes offered by the faculty.

Research Project (CI 593)

The research project is an important beginning experience in doing actual research in a chosen area of study.  The research project may also give you an opportunity to explore and pilot ideas for your dissertation research.  You may seek out any faculty to guide and oversee your research project.  Ideally, you would engage in all aspects of research from design through execution, analysis, and writing of results. Such work may lead to a presentation at a scholarly conference or to submission of a manuscript to a professional journal or other publication (e.g., a book chapter, journal paper, etc.).  See Section V on the possible need for IRB approval before conducting a research project. Collaborating with faculty on a larger research project may also be used to fulfill this requirement.

You should consult with your faculty advisor to determine when you are ready to embark on a research project.  You must then find a faculty member to help design and conduct the project.  This faculty member may be your program advisor or another faculty member who has particular expertise and experience to support the project. 

Independent Study (CI 596)

In consultation with your advisor, and with the agreement and approval of a supervising faculty member, you may choose to register for an Independent Study (CI 596) project.   This option allows you to design, implement and analyze the results of a research problem in your area of specialization.

Annual Reviews

You are required to submit a formal progress report each year.  These reports provide you with an opportunity to reflect on whether you are meeting your goals while allowing faculty to assess whether adequate progress is being made.  Program faculty review and discuss these reports and provide written feedback to you about whether you are meeting expectations.  Recommendations for ways to enhance or sustain your progress are a likely result of this process.  If you are not making adequate progress you may be placed on probation and given directive feedback on how to proceed.

Preliminary Examination

The purpose of the preliminary examination is to determine your readiness to undertake dissertation research.  The examination has two parts: a written portion (written prelims) that focuses primarily on your program of study, and an oral portion (oral prelims) that focuses primarily on your dissertation proposal.  Passing the preliminary examination constitutes formal admission to candidacy for the PhD.

Written prelims should be taken when you have completed your coursework, or concurrently with your last course(s).  Oral prelims should be taken after you pass the written prelims and have completed your dissertation proposal.  Passing the oral prelims constitutes approval of your dissertation research direction.  Before beginning your dissertation research, you must also receive approval from the Institutional Review Board (IRB) if the research involves human subjects (see Section V).

Written Prelims

You should begin making arrangements to take the written prelims when you have finished, or you are almost finishing, your coursework.  First, you must find a faculty member to chair your written prelims committee.  Your faculty program advisor can help with this task.  Your program advisor may serve as a your committee chair, or you may identify another Mathematics and Science Education program faculty member whose interests and expertise align more closely with your program of study and dissertation research.  You should work with the committee chair to identify and recruit at least two other members to serve on your written prelims committee. Your written prelims committee may, or may not, grow into your 5-member dissertation committee that evaluates your oral prelims, which is the defense of your dissertation proposal.  Thus, as you put together your written prelims committee, know the guidelines for the composition of the oral prelims committee, which is the same as your dissertation committee.

The chair of the written prelims committee will convene the other committee members to develop questions for the exam.  Generally, these questions ask you to integrate and apply knowledge and understandings gained from your coursework, research project, and independent readings with an eye onto your dissertation research direction.  You may choose to take the exam at the university or as a take-home assignment.  Written prelims are evaluated on a pass/fail basis.  If necessary, the entire exam or some portion can be retaken once.  After you have passed this exam, the chair will submit a form indicating this accomplishment to the College of Education Office of Student Services for inclusion in your file.

Dissertation Proposal

Your coursework, research project, independent readings, and written prelims should give you a good start on planning your dissertation research.  After passing the written prelims, you must complete a proposal for your dissertation research that you will defend during your oral prelims.

Dissertation research may be developed from the many possibilities related to your area of study and from a variety of research traditions.  The process of writing a dissertation proposal is challenging, but it provides great opportunities for creative and personally rewarding work.  Students often find it helpful to draw on their studies to date and avail themselves of the advice and support of their committee chair and members, other faculty, and fellow students whenever possible. Dissertation proposals may take many forms and be of varying lengths.  The organization, content, and length of the proposal are issues that you should decide in consultation with the chair of your dissertation committee. 

When you and your committee chair agree that the dissertation proposal is ready for review and approval, you will work with the chair to distribute the proposal to members of your oral prelims committee (see below under Oral Prelims section) and schedule the defense of your proposal.  The proposal should be distributed to committee members for review at least three weeks before the scheduled date.  It is strongly recommended that a draft of the IRB application is included in the proposal.  As a rule, you should not submit your application to the IRB before the oral prelims are completed because committees may make recommendations for changing research protocols during the exam (i.e., proposal defense).  See Section V for information about IRB requirements and procedures.

Oral Prelims

The oral prelims are a hearing on the dissertation proposal with the primary function to assess and approve the dissertation research proposal. 

Although the oral prelims committee can be later changed if needed, it should generally be expected to serve also as your dissertation committee and formed accordingly.  The dissertation committee should consist of five members including your chair who must be a Mathematics and Science Education program faculty. At least three members, including the chair, must be UIC faculty who are full members of the Graduate College.  Tenured or tenure-track faculty are usually full members of the Graduate College; clinical and visiting faculty generally are not.  Links to a listing of full members are available on the Graduate College website: http://grad.uic.edu/cms/?pid=1000207.  At least two committee members must be tenured faculty in the College of Education (i.e., associate professors or professors).  Also, at least two members must be Mathematics and Science Education program faculty.  The Graduate College also requires that a member is from outside the Program (see Section IV).  You should work with your oral prelims committee chair to identify and recruit at least four other members (possibly including any who have served on your written prelims committee) to serve on your oral prelims committee. 

In order to formally constitute the oral prelims committee, you must submit to the Graduate College a Committee Recommendation Form.  This form may be obtained from the Graduate College’s website: http://grad.uic.edu/cms/?pid=1000329.    At the same time, you should ask the College of Education Office of Student Services (3145 EPASW) for a degree checklist (see Section IV).  A list of the courses taken is available through the my.UIC portal: https://my.uic.edu/common/ . You must return the completed degree checklist with the signed Committee Recommendation Form to the College of Education Office of Student Services.  The completed form must be signed by the committee chair and submitted to the College of Education Office of Student Services at least three weeks before the date of the examination.  Before submitting this form, you must be sure that the faculty members identified to serve on the committee have agreed to serve.  If you want to include a committee member who is not on the faculty at UIC or is not a member of the UIC Graduate College, the Graduate College must approve that member.  This approval process is initiated when the Committee Recommendation Form is submitted to the College of Education Office of Student Services.  A copy of the potential committee member’s full current curriculum vitae must be submitted with the Committee Recommendation Form.

The oral prelims are evaluated on a pass-fail basis.  If two or more members of the oral prelims committee assign a failing grade, the student fails the exam. Students who fail are sometimes asked to do additional work on or to revise their dissertation proposal before their committee gives final approval.  Even if the committee does not fail a student, it may require that the student make particular changes in the dissertation proposal before the proposal is approved.

Passing the oral prelims signifies that committee members have given their approval for you to carry out your proposed dissertation research.  Once you have reached this point, you must submit the final version of the IRB application for approval (see Section V).  Before an application is submitted to the IRB, you must have it reviewed and signed by the committee chair and the chair of the Curriculum and Instruction Department. 

Dissertation Research (CI 599, 12 hours minimum)

After passing the oral prelims and receiving approval from the IRB, you may begin your dissertation research.  You must register for a minimum of 12 hours of dissertation credit during the time you conduct and write up your study.  After registering for the minimum of 12 hours of dissertation credit, if you have passed both the written and oral prelims, you may petition the Graduate College to be permitted to register for 0 (zero) hours of dissertation credit.  If permission is granted, you may continue to register for 0 hours if you continue to make satisfactory progress and are within the time limits for completion of the degree.  Note that even if you are eligible and successfully petition the Graduate College to register for 0 hours, you still must register for 0 hours each semester until you have successfully defended the dissertation (although you do not need to register for 0 credits for the summer session unless the defense will be held during the summer).

The Graduate College makes an exception to the above registration requirement if the defense will occur during the late registration period for a term; in those cases, a doctoral defense will be allowed without student registration in that term.  This is assuming that you were registered the previous term, or the previous spring term in the instance of a fall defense (which should be the case since, as stated above, continuous registration is required).  The late registration period is the official first ten days of any fall or spring semester and the first five days of the summer term.  If you defend after the 10th day (5th in summer) you must be registered.

If you hold a fellowship, assistantship and/or tuition waiver, and do not resign from it, then registration is mandatory for the number of hours required to hold the award or assistantship.  If you hold a student visa, you probably do not have to register if you leave the country by the 10th day (5th in summer), although this should be verified with Office of International Services.

This (late period registration defense) exception does not affect the registration requirement to take the Preliminary Examination, or the general requirement of continuous registration from Preliminary Examination to defense.  Failure to register continuously may result in being administratively dropped from the program.  You should refer to Section IV for important additional information about constituting a dissertation committee and conducting dissertation research. 

Dissertation Defense

When nearing the end of dissertation research, you should begin to plan your dissertation defense with your dissertation committee chair.  See Section IV for specific information about organizing and scheduling a dissertation defense and filing all the paperwork required before the defense can be conducted.

According to Graduate College regulations, at least one year must pass between completing the oral prelims and the dissertation defense.  If you fail to complete all program requirements, including the dissertation defense, within five years of passing the oral prelims, you must retake them.

PhD in Special Education

The Ph.D. Program in Special Education prepares students for careers as university scholars and professors, as well as for leadership positions in educational institutions.  Within the context of urban education, this program emphasizes theory and research on emotional/behavior disorders, language and learning disabilities, developmental and intellectual disabilities, early intervention, transition, and teacher preparation.  Students have the opportunity to be involved in research in a wide range of critical issues in special education using a variety of research methodologies.  Research topics may include parent-child and peer interactions, bilingual special education, social skills in students with disabilities, language and literacy in students with disabilities, inclusion and public policy, early intervention models, and preparation of special education teachers and leaders for urban schools.

Overview of Requirements (Fall 2013)

This program requires a minimum of 96 semester hours beyond the baccalaureate degree, or a minimum of 64 semester hours beyond the master’s degree.  These requirements include a 6-hour research project and 12 hours of dissertation credit.  You are also required to pass written and oral portions of a preliminary examination and successfully defend your dissertation research.  If you enter the program with an earned master’s degree in a field relevant to special education, the requirements are:

  • COE Doctoral Studies Core —12 hours
  • Methodology Requirement –- 12 hours
  • Special Education Program Core — 22 hours (minimum)
  • Research Project — 6 hours
  • Preliminary Examination — Written Portion
  • Preparation of a Dissertation Research Proposal
  • Preliminary Examination—Oral Portion
  • Dissertation Research — 12 hours (minimum)
  • Dissertation Defense

If you enter with a bachelor’s degree but not a master’s degree, you must take a minimum of 32 hours of additional coursework in an area of specialization approved by your advisor.

Doctoral Studies Core (12 hours)

All doctoral degrees in the College of Education require a core of courses that focuses on different types of research in educational settings, research design, and the analysis of educational data.  These core courses will help you develop the minimum skills needed to evaluate research literature and to begin your own independent research.  You are encouraged to take these core courses early in your program; however, you may take other courses in the program before completing this set of courses. 

The requirements of the Doctoral Studies Core are:

  • ED 504—Urban Contexts and Educational Research (4 hours)
  • ED 505—Introduction to Educational Research: Paradigms and Processes (4 hours)
  • ED 506—Introduction to Educational Research: Designs and Analyses (4 hours)
Methodology Requirement (12 hours)

In addition to the Doctoral Studies Core above, you must take a minimum of three research methodology courses as described below.  Note also that you may choose or be encouraged by your faculty advisor to take additional courses in research methodology beyond these minimums in order to meet your personal scholarly and professional goals.

The Methodology Requirement includes:

  • ED 502—Essentials of Qualitative Inquiry in Education (4 hours)
  • ED 503/EPSY 503—Essentials of Quantitative Inquiry in Education (4 hours)
  • A third methodology course selected in consultation with your advisor (4 hours)
Special Education Program Core (22 hours minimum)

All students in the Ph.D. in Special Education program must take a minimum of 22 semester hours in coursework related to the field of special education.  At least 16 of those hours must be taken in the College of Education. 

All students in the program must take:

  • SPED 564—Proseminar in Special Education (4 hours)
  • Three special education seminars—SPED 592 (4 hours each for a total of 12 hours)

Recent Special Education seminars (SPED 592) have focused on research on literacy, teacher preparation, inclusion policies, and qualitative methods. 

You may take your elective courses within the Department of Special Education or in other departments of the College of Education.  While you may take all your courses in the College of Education, you are encouraged to take courses in other departments and units of the University such as Disability Studies, Psychology, and Sociology.  Study outside the College of Education can help you develop additional conceptual and methodological tools for use in the study of educational issues. 

You should be aware that 22 semester hours is the minimum number of hours required to establish an area of specialization.  Students typically take more than the minimum number of courses, or may be required to do so by their faculty advisors.

Teaching Internship

A teaching internship is strongly recommended for those individuals intending to pursue a career in higher education or school leadership.  A teaching internship requires that you register for SPED 538 (up to 8 hours) and co-teach a university course under the direction of a faculty instructor.  The course should be related to your interests and future career objectives.  A faculty member will be the instructor of record and will supervise you closely throughout the internship.  You will assume responsibility for course instruction, student interaction, and evaluation to the extent negotiated with the instructor.  You should complete this requirement prior to being considered for a visiting lecturer position.  In addition to this internship, you are encouraged to seek opportunities to deliver guest lectures in other classes offered by the Department of Special Education. 

Research Project (SPED 593, 6 hours)

The research project is an important initial experience in doing research on actual issues in your chosen area of study.  The research project may also provide an opportunity to explore and pilot ideas for dissertation research.  If you wish, you may collaborate on research projects with program faculty and perhaps with other doctoral students.  Ideally, you would work on such projects with faculty as full research colleagues and be involved in all aspects of the project, from design through implementation, analysis, and writing of results.  Such work may culminate in a presentation at a scholarly conference or in submission of a manuscript to a professional journal for publication.  You should consult your faculty advisor to determine when you are ready to embark on your research project.  As you design your project, you should discuss with your advisor the need for Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval for your project.  Information about IRB approval of student research is contained in Section V of this handbook. 

Annual Reviews

To enable you and your faculty advisor to monitor and provide feedback on your progress through the program, you are required to prepare and submit a formal progress report each year.  This involves completing a form called the Professional Development Plan (PDP), which lists courses and experiences needed across different competency domains.  Department faculty review and discuss your performance and give written feedback and recommendations to enhance or sustain your progress in attaining course, teaching, and research goals.  If you do not complete the annual review process you will not be able to register for future semesters until you have submitted a PDP. (Note for Ph.D. students who were admitted after 2010:  in the annual review process, students whose progress raises serious concerns for two consecutive years will be dropped from the program.)

The Preliminary Examination

The purpose of the preliminary examination is to determine your readiness to undertake dissertation research.  The examination has two parts—a written portion that focuses primarily on your program of study, and an oral portion that focuses primarily on your dissertation proposal.  Both portions are evaluated by a preliminary examination committee.  Passing the preliminary examination constitutes formal admission to candidacy for the Ph.D.

The written portion of the preliminary examination should be taken when you have completed most, though not necessarily all, of your coursework.  The oral portion of the exam should be taken when the dissertation proposal is completed.  You must take and pass the oral portion of the exam before beginning your dissertation research. Also before dissertation research can begin, the Institutional Review Board (IRB) must give approval (see Section V).

Forming a Preliminary Examination Committee

You should begin making arrangements to take preliminary examinations when you have almost finished your coursework. First, you must find a faculty member to chair your preliminary examination committee.  Faculty program advisors may serve as committee chairs, or may help to identify another special education faculty member whose interests and expertise may align more closely with your program of study and dissertation research.  You should work with your faculty advisor to identify and recruit at least four other members to serve on your examination committee. 

At least three members, including the chair, must be UIC faculty who are full members of the Graduate College.  Tenured or tenure-track faculty are usually full members of the Graduate College; clinical and visiting faculty generally are not.  At least two committee members must be tenured faculty in the College of Education faculty (i.e., associate professors or full professors).  Also, at least two members (in addition to the chair) must be in the Department of Special Education.  The Graduate College does not require that the preliminary examination committee include a member from outside the Department.  However, since the Graduate College does require that each dissertation committee have a member from outside the program (see Section IV), you may want to ask an outside member to be on your preliminary examination committee as well.

Professors who have emeritus status maintain their same rights to work with doctoral students for at least a three-year term (this term is renewable).  They can serve as doctoral advisors, committee chairs, and committee members.  If they were tenured and full members of the Graduate College at the time of their retirement, these professors emeriti retain these statuses for purposes of composing an exam or dissertation committee.

In order to formally constitute the preliminary examination committee, you must submit to the Graduate College a Committee Recommendation Form.  This form may be obtained from the Graduate College’s website: http://grad.uic.edu/cms/?pid=1000329.    At the same time, you should ask the Office of Student Services (3145 ETMSW) for a degree checklist (see Section IV).  A list of the courses you have taken is available through the my.UIC portal: https://my.uic.edu/common/ . You must return the completed degree checklist with the signed Committee Recommendation Form to the Office of Student Services.  The completed form must be signed by the committee chairperson and submitted to the Office of Student Services at least three weeks before the date of the examination.  Before submitting this form, you must be sure that the faculty members identified to serve on the committee have agreed to serve.  If you want to include a committee member who is not on the faculty at UIC or is not a member of the UIC Graduate College, the Graduate College must approve that member.  This approval process is initiated when the Committee Recommendation Form is submitted to the Office of Student Services.  A copy of the potential committee member’s full current curriculum vitae must be submitted with the Committee Recommendation Form.

Written Portion of the Exam

The chairperson of the preliminary examination committee will convene at least two other committee members (one of whom must be in the Department of Special Education) to develop questions for the written portion of the exam.  The written portion of the preliminary examination consists of a comprehensive take-home exam.  Questions for the take-home exam may address any area that is relevant to your course of study, including topics related to your proposed dissertation.  You will have the opportunity to inform your committee of relevant topics.  The committee will take these topics into consideration and subsequently assign questions that you can address over a ten-day period.  Your preliminary exam committee will read the exam.  Responses should be written in a style typical of scholarly writing and in APA Manual format (6th edition).  You must pass the written portion of the exam to take the oral portion of the exam, which focuses primarily on the dissertation proposal.  After you have passed the written portion of the exam, the chair will submit a form indicating this accomplishment to the Office of Student Services for inclusion in your file.

Preparing a Dissertation Proposal

Your coursework, research project, and independent readings should give you a good start on planning dissertation research.  It is important for you to decide on a topic, conduct a relevant review of literature, and carry out a pilot study before taking the written portion of the preliminary examination.  Of course, the written portion of the exam will help develop further your ideas for your dissertation research.  After completing the written portion of the preliminary examination, you should prepare to complete your proposal for dissertation research and prepare for the oral portion of the preliminary examination.

Dissertation research may be developed from the many possibilities related to your area of study and from a variety of research traditions.  The process of writing a dissertation proposal is challenging, but it provides unprecedented opportunities for contributing to our field, as well as creative and personally rewarding work.  You should draw on your studies to date and avail yourself of the advice and support of your committee chair, committee members, and other faculty.  The organization, content, and length of the proposal are issues that you will decide with the chair of your preliminary examination committee, in consultation with other committee members.

When you and the committee chair agree that the dissertation proposal is ready for review and approval, you should work with the chair to distribute the proposal to members of the preliminary examination committee and to schedule the oral portion of the preliminary exam.  The proposal should be distributed to committee members for review at least three weeks before the scheduled exam date.  It is strongly recommended that you include in the proposal a draft of the IRB application.  As a rule, you should not submit your application to the IRB before the oral portion of the examination is completed because committees may make recommendations for changing research protocols during the exam.  (See Section V for more information about IRB requirements and procedures.)

Oral Portion of the Exam

The oral portion of the preliminary exam is primarily a hearing on the dissertation proposal, although it may also address aspects of the written portion of the exam.  The oral portion of the exam must be taken and passed before dissertation research can begin.  The primary function of the oral portion of the exam is committee review, revision, and approval of the dissertation research proposal. 

Evaluation of the Preliminary Exam

Both written and oral portions of the preliminary examination are evaluated on a pass-fail basis.  If two or more members of the preliminary examination committee assign a failing grade to a portion of the exam, you fail that portion.  If necessary, the entire portion of the exam or some element of that portion can be retaken once.  If you fail the oral portion of the exam you may be asked to do additional work or to revise your dissertation proposal before the committee gives final approval.  Even if a committee does not fail you on the oral portion of the exam, it may require that you make particular changes in the dissertation proposal before the proposal is approved.

Passing the oral portion of the preliminary exam signifies that committee members have given their approval for you to carry out your proposed dissertation research.  Once you have reached this point, you must submit the final version of the IRB application for approval (see Section V).  Before submitting an application to the IRB you must have it reviewed and signed by the committee chair and the chair of the Department of Special Education. 

After you pass both the oral and written portions of the preliminary exam, you are considered to have advanced to candidacy. 

Dissertation Research (SPED 599, 12 hours minimum)

After passing the oral portion of the preliminary examination and receiving approval from the IRB, you (now designated a ‘doctoral candidate’) may begin your dissertation research.  You must register for a minimum of 12 hours of dissertation credit during the time that you conduct and write up your research.  After you have registered for the minimum of 12 hours of dissertation credit you may petition the Graduate College to be permitted to register for 0 (zero) hours of dissertation credit.  See Section IV, Registration Guidelines for Doctoral Candidates, for details and exceptions. 

Dissertation Defense

When you near the end of dissertation research, you should begin to plan your dissertation defense with your dissertation committee chair.  See Section IV for specific information about organizing and scheduling a meeting for the dissertation defense and filing all the paperwork required before the defense can be conducted.

According to Graduate College regulations, at least one year must pass between completing the oral portion of the preliminary examination and the dissertation defense.  If you fail to complete all program requirements, including the dissertation defense, within five years of passing the oral portion of the preliminary examination you must retake the preliminary examination.

PhD in Educational Psychology

The Ph.D. in Educational Psychology prepares students to conduct research on psychological processes as they affect student learning and successful teaching in urban settings.  Graduates become research experts and innovators in one of two focus areas; Human Development and Learning or Measurement, Evaluation, Statistics, and Assessment.  Nevertheless, all graduates are expected to have knowledge of the main areas of research found in the field of Educational Psychology.  In addition to accepting traditional academic research positions, our graduates work for private and not-for-profit organizations, national and state licensing and certification boards, state and federal agencies, and testing companies.

Overview of Requirements (Fall 2013)

The Ph.D. in Educational Psychology requires a minimum of 96 semester hours beyond the baccalaureate degree, and a minimum of 64 semester hours beyond the master’s degree.  These requirements include completion of a 12-hour Doctoral Studies Core, a 12-hour Methodology Requirement, a 4-hour research project, and 12 semester hours of dissertation research.  You are also required to pass written and oral portions of a preliminary examination and successfully defend your dissertation research.  Specific requirements are as follows for students who enter the program with an earned master’s degree. 

  • COE Doctoral Studies Core —12 hours
  • Methodology Requirement –-- 12 hours
  • Educational Psychology Program Core — 8 hours
  • Area of Specialization —16 hours
  • Research Project — 4 hours
  • Preliminary Examination — Written Portion
  • Preparation of a Dissertation Research Proposal
  • Preliminary Examination — Oral Portion
  • Dissertation Research — 12 hours (minimum)
  • Dissertation Defense

 

Earning a Masters degree while enrolled in the doctoral program.  If you enter with a bachelor’s degree but not a master’s degree you are required to take up to 32 hours of additional coursework (the equivalent of a master’s degree) in an area of specialization.  Any student who chooses to do so may earn a master’s degree while enrolled in the Ph.D. program, but should be alerted to the fact that those courses that are aligned with an M.Ed. degree cannot simultaneously be applied toward the Ph.D. 

You are free to substitute a more advanced course for any of the required core courses that are normally associated with the Ph.D. in Educational Psychology.  Decisions about which courses to substitute are normally made in consultation with your program advisor, the Director of Graduate Studies for the Educational Psychology Department, and the Graduate College.

 

Doctoral Studies Core (12 hours)

All doctoral degrees in the College of Education require a core of courses that focuses on different types of research in educational settings, research design, and the analysis of educational data.  These core courses will help you develop the minimum skills needed to evaluate research literature and to begin your own independent research.  You are encouraged to take these core courses early in your program; however, you may take other courses in the program before completing this set of courses. 

The requirements of the Doctoral Studies Core are:

  • ED 504—Urban Contexts and Educational Research (4 hours)
  • ED 505—Introduction to Educational Research: Paradigms and Processes (4 hours)
  • ED 506—Introduction to Educational Research: Designs and Analyses (4 hours)

 

Methodology Requirement (12 hours)

In addition to the Doctoral Studies Core above, you must take a minimum of three research methodology courses as described below.  Note also that you may choose or be encouraged by your faculty advisor to take additional courses in research methodology beyond these minimums in order to meet your personal scholarly and professional goals.

The Methodology Requirement includes:

  • ED 502—Essentials of Qualitative Inquiry in Education (4 hours)
  • ED 503/EPSY 503—Essentials of Quantitative Inquiry in Education (4 hours)
  • A third methodology course selected in consultation with your advisor (4 hours)

 

Educational Psychology Program Core (8 hours)

To explore breadth in the field of Educational Psychology, all students, regardless of their focus area, enroll in three program core courses, totaling 10 semester hours.

  • EPSY 500 --- Proseminar in Educational Psychology I: Socialization into the Field (2 hrs)
  • EPSY 501 --- Theories of Educational Psychology (4 hours)
  • EPSY 508 --- Proseminar in Educational Psychology II: Discourses in the Field (2 hours)

 

Area of Emphasis (16 hours minimum)

This Ph.D. program requires that you take courses in both the College of Education and the Department of Psychology.   All students enroll in a breadth core that involves exposure to the range of topics typically associated with a degree in Educational Psychology.  Nevertheless, you are typically admitted into one of the following two focus areas.

 

Human Development and Learning

This concentration includes most of the school-based research that is salient in the field of Educational Psychology.  Individuals who focus primarily on human development usually specialize in issues that pertain to early childhood, middle childhood, adolescence, or adulthood as well as a substantive area of emphasis salient in the field of human development.  Individuals who focus on learning typically specialize in processes of cognition and how knowledge of cognitive processes can be used to shape instruction and the learning environment.  Available areas of expertise change as the composition of the faculty and the field change.  You are advised to look at the research interests of current faculty to determine which topical interests to focus on during your program of study.  Our current faculty members specialize in the following three areas.

 

Cognition and instruction.  This research area involves a multidisciplinary group of faculty members and students interested in Learning Sciences.  Specific areas of study within this concentration include cognitive development, metacognition and self-regulated learning, reading comprehension and text processing, learning from multimedia materials, design of learning environments, and the use of cognitive models in assessment.

Early childhood educationThis research area focuses on the cognitive and social development of young children. Specific areas of study include social and cognitive development, cultural differences in parent-child interaction, children's play, and the development of children with learning disabilities.

Social developmentThis research area focuses on processes of social growth and cultural factors that affect individuals’ development and educational processes. Specific areas of study include cultural factors in students’ development and learning, emotional and other forms of socio-moral development, gender roles and gender identity, legitimate parent and teacher authority in relation to student autonomy, motivation, peer relations, play, and social competence.

 

Measurement, Evaluation, Statistics, and Assessment 

This focus area combines training in measurement, evaluation, statistics, and assessment with research experiences gained from participation in research projects. In Measurement and Evaluation, specific areas of study include measurement theory, Rasch measurement, Item Response Theory, true score theory, generalizability theory, test score equating, standard setting, instrument design, and program evaluation. In Statistics, areas of study include statistical theory, hierarchical linear modeling, nonparametric modeling, regression analysis, multivariate analysis, structural equation modeling, factor analysis, causal analysis, categorical data analysis, research synthesis and meta-analysis, exploratory data analysis, model estimation, model goodness-of-fit analysis, model selection, robust analysis, missing-data analysis, and research methods. In Assessment, study areas include qualitative methods, testing for licensure and certification, computer adaptive testing, large-scale testing, and classroom-based assessment.

 

You  can specialize in a particular focus area, yet everyone is encouraged to take courses in each of four areas.  Available areas of expertise change as the composition of the faculty and the field change.  You are advised to look at the research interests of current faculty and determine your own topical interests as early in their program of study as possible.  Our current faculty members specialize in the following four areas.

 

Measurement.  Measurement courses cover a range of theories, models, and methods for measuring variables of aptitude, achievement, and attitudes. They include test, questionnaire, rating scale, and survey construction for data collection, and include contemporary measurement models for data analysis. These courses are designed to prepare researchers and practitioners to meet measurement challenges they will encounter when conducting research and applying measurement models in a variety of settings.

Evaluation.  Evaluation courses deal with the systematic collection of information about the activities, characteristics, and outcomes of programs and how this information can be used to make judgments about program quality, improve program effectiveness, and/or inform decisions about future program development.  Students learn about evaluation theory and methods in coursework emphasizing the processes associated with planning and conducting evaluations. They become informed, critical consumers of standards-based assessment procedures and program evaluation.

Statistics.  This concentration enables students to conduct evidence-based research, to rigorously answer questions that are important to the educational and social sciences.  Statistics courses cover a broad range of statistical models that are useful for the analysis of many types of data sets. They include models that discover the relationship between one variable with and a set of other variables, and models that describe causal relationships between variables (for example, the causal effects of educational treatments on academic achievement). Students who take statistics courses will gain the knowledge, skills, and abilities to analyze, interpret, and draw accurate conclusions from data.

Assessment.  Assessment courses focus on the process of collecting, synthesizing, analyzing, and interpreting quantitative and qualitative information to aid in decision-making.  Assessment training allows students to design, administer, score, and interpret results from various types of assessments that measure simple and complex learning outcomes.  Students learn how to design paper-and-pencil tests, performance assessments, and product assessments that are aligned with those standards that are to be evaluated as well as how to interpret various statistical findings.  These skills can be used for a variety of purposes including the interpretation of score reports, determining appropriate modifications or accommodations when using a tool to assess the performance of students with disabilities or language limitations, the development and defense of grading procedures, and important legal purposes associated with education and employment.

 

Selecting an area of emphasis.  Within each focus area, you may select the remaining courses to form your own area of emphasis (minimum of 16 hours).  These courses are usually chosen in consultation with your faculty advisor.  A minimum of 8 hours should be Educational Psychology or Psychology courses.  At least 3 of these 8 hours should focus on Psychology.  Note that the required course hours are the minimum number required. You may wish to take more than the minimum number of courses or may be required to do so by your advisor.

 

Although you may take all your courses in the College of Education and the Psychology Department, you are strongly encouraged to take courses in other UIC departments as well.  Such courses can strengthen your conceptual and methodological knowledge (needed for independent research) and broaden your exposure to the range of research perspectives of faculty members in your specific area of interest.

 

Research Project (EPSY 593, 4 hours)

The research project is an important beginning experience in doing research on actual problems in your chosen area of study.  The research project usually offers you an opportunity to explore and pilot test ideas for your dissertation research.  You may seek out a program faculty member to collaborate with on a research project and perhaps collaborate with other doctoral students.  Ideally, you will work on such projects as a full research colleague and be involved in all aspects of the project from design through execution, analysis, and writing of results.  Such work may lead to a presentation at a scholarly conference or to submission of a manuscript to a professional journal for publication.  (See Section V on the need for IRB approval of a proposed research project.)

 

You should consult with your faculty advisor to determine when you are ready to embark on this research project.  You are responsible for obtaining the assistance of a faculty member when designing and completing a research project.  You are also responsible for taking the initiative needed to fully complete the research project and this step indicates a readiness to complete a dissertation (see below). The sponsoring faculty member may be either a your program advisor or another faculty member who will bring particular expertise and experience to support the project.

 

Annual Reviews

You are required to submit a formal progress report each year.  These reports provide you with an opportunity to reflect on whether you are meeting your goals while allowing faculty to assess whether adequate progress is being made.  Program faculty review and discuss these reports and provide written feedback to you about whether you are meeting expectations.  Recommendations for ways to enhance or sustain your progress are a likely result of this process.  If you are not making adequate progress you may be placed on probation and given directive feedback on how to proceed.

 

The Preliminary Examination Process

You are required to complete a dissertation to earn your Ph.D., and to verify your readiness for such research, you will proceed through a preliminary examination process.  This process is complex and involves the formation of at least one committee of 5 faculty members, comprised of at least two faculty members from the UIC College of Education.  It is common for a student to establish one committee of 5 faculty members who serve both as the members of the Preliminary Examination Committee and who serve as members of the Dissertation Committee.  It is also common for the Chair of each committee to be the same person.  Nevertheless, for a wide range of reasons, you may need to form two different committees, replace individual members on a committee, or to otherwise adjust this process.  Below is a detailed outline of the requirements for both committees and how these committees guide you through the final, and often most difficult, portions of the doctoral program.  More information on the steps that occur after the Preliminary Examination and requirements for doctoral candidates can be found in Section IV.

 

Steps for the Preliminary Examination

The purpose of the preliminary examination is to determine your readiness to undertake dissertation research.  The examination has three steps—a written portion demonstrates expertise in a specific focus area, a dissertation proposal outlines the dissertation project, and an oral examination is a review of both the dissertation proposal and your readiness to execute the project being proposed.  All three steps are evaluated by members of a Preliminary Examination Committee; the written examination is evaluated by at least three members of the Preliminary Examination Committee and the dissertation proposal review and oral examination includes all 5 committee members.  Once you have completed all three steps, you are formally admitted to candidacy for the Ph.D, and may be referred to as a ‘Doctoral Candidate’. 

 

The written examination.  The written portion of the preliminary examination should be taken when you have completed most, though not necessarily all, of your coursework.  This step offers evidence that you have the necessary expertise to undertake dissertation research.  You will pass this step after at least 3 members of your Preliminary Examination Committee read the written exam and agree that you have demonstrated a readiness to proceed to the design of a proposal.  This is noted in your academic record by completing a form indicating that you have passed the written examination and filing that with the Office of Student Services in the College of Education.

The dissertation proposal.  After successfully passing the written examination, you will be asked to write a dissertation proposal.  It is likely you and the Chair of your Preliminary Examination Committee will first work through the process of designing a proposal and the related application for approval by UIC’s Institutional Review Board (IRB) before submitting a full draft of the proposal to the committee.  Once you and your Chair are satisfied that the proposal is ready for full committee review, the proposal is then disseminated to the full committee.  Nevertheless, it is also common for a student to seek the advice of all of his or her committee members at some point during the design of the dissertation proposal.  The formal committee is noted in your record by completing the Committee Recommendation Form and sending that to the Office of Student Services which then sends that on to the Graduate College where your record undergoes a formal transcript review to ensure that all the program requirements necessary to proceed to the oral defense have been met.

Oral defense of the dissertation proposal.  The final step of the Preliminary Examination Process involves an oral defense of the dissertation proposal and the committee’s recommendation that you are ready to move to Candidacy and complete the dissertation.  Once the proposal is complete and sent to the full Preliminary Examination Committee, an oral defense is scheduled to include the full members of the Preliminary Examination Committee.  You are required to take and pass the oral portion of the exam before beginning your dissertation research.  In addition, you should also receive approval from the Institutional Review Board (IRB) (see Section V), even if it reflects a declaration that the project is exempt from IRB review.  Movement to candidacy is noted in your record by having all faculty members indicate that the student has passed the entire Preliminary Examination process using the signature form generated by the Graduate College.  Once that form has been processed, you are designated as a Doctoral Candidate (ABD in casual conversation).

 

Forming a Preliminary Examination Committee

You should begin making arrangements to take the preliminary examination when your coursework is nearly completed.  First, you should find a faculty member to chair the Preliminary Examination Committee.  Typically, this person is your faculty program advisor, but if interests migrate it may be necessary to identify another faculty member whose interests and expertise may align more closely with your program of study and dissertation research.  You are required to have a committee chair who is a member of the Educational Psychology faculty although you may choose a faculty member outside Educational Psychology to serve as co-chair of your committee.  The Graduate College now officially acknowledges the roles of chair and advisor to indicate such collaborations.  You will work with your committee chair(s) to build a committee of 5 members who are willing to serve.  At least three members, including the chair, should be UIC faculty who are Full Members of the Graduate College.  Tenured or tenure-track faculty members are generally Full Members of the Graduate College; clinical and visiting faculty members generally are not.  At least two committee members should be tenured faculty in the College of Education (i.e., Associate Professors or Full Professors).  The Graduate College does not require that the Preliminary Examination Committee include a member from outside the Department.  However, since the Graduate College does require that all Dissertation Committees have a member from outside the program (see Section IV), and we prefer that you work with the same individuals as members of your Preliminary Examination Committee and as members of the Dissertation Committee, you should ask an outside member to serve in both capacities.

Once you are ready to defend your proposal, your Preliminary Examination Committee is formally constituted by submitting a Committee Recommendation Form to the Office of Student Services and the Graduate College.  This step typically occurs after you have successfully passed the Written Examination and have prepared a dissertation proposal that you and your Preliminary Examination Committee Chair agree is ready for a defense.  Before submitting the Committee Recommendation Form,you should be sure that all potential committee members have agreed to serve.  To include a member who is not on the UIC faculty or is not a member of the UIC Graduate College, approval from the Graduate College is required.  This approval process is initiated by submitting, along with the Committee Recommendation Form, a copy of that outside person’s full current curriculum vitae to the Office of Student Services.

 

Step 1: The Written Examination

The written portion of the preliminary examination will focus on your area of expertise and interest within Educational Psychology.  This document will be reviewed by at least 3 UIC faculty members who are also members of the Preliminary Examination Committee, one of whom is a member of the Educational Psychology Program Faculty (often the committee Chair or Co-chair).  There are three options for the written portion of the exam.  You may indicate a preferred option, but the Preliminary Examination Committee will make the final decision concerning the form of your examination.

Options 1 and 2:  The Chair, in conjunction with other committee members, will write an examination consisting of three to five questions.  These questions will tap your knowledge of the following areas as the areas relate to your specific area of interest: (a) research design and methodology; (b) theoretical constructs and systems; (c) empirical research; and (d) implications for teaching and learning, where applicable.  In Option 1, the questions are administered as a take-home exam with a deadline negotiated between you and your committee members.  Appropriate response length may vary for each question, but in no case should a response to a question exceed 20 double-spaced typewritten pages.  In Option 2, the questions are administered as a proctored exam at the College.  If the first version of either of these options is not of passing quality, you will have one opportunity to retake the exam.

Option 3:  You may review the literature on a topic related to your area of specialization and write a critical review in a form that would be suitable for publication.  After receiving evaluations from members of the Preliminary Examination Committee, you will have the opportunity to submit one revision.

You indicate your preferred option by submitting to your committee chair a one- to two-page statement of the problem outlining the topic of investigation for the preliminary examination.  If  you prefer Options 1 or 2, this statement should indicate your particular area(s) of interest and specialization within Educational Psychology.  If you prefer Option 3, this statement should indicate your intended paper topic and a beginning list of references.  After consulting with both you and the members of your Preliminary Examination Committee, the chair will indicate whether this problem statement has been approved.  You may be asked  to revise your proposed statement of intent or to select a different option.  Therefore, you should factor time for such revisions into the overall project timeline.

This written examination step is completed once at least three members of the Preliminary Examination Committee have agreed that your work indicates that you are ready to proceed to the design of a dissertation proposal.  This step is recorded when the three committee members who participated in this step sign and submit to the Office of Student Services the Written Examination Form.

 

Step 2: Preparing a Dissertation Proposal

Your coursework, research project, and independent readings should give you a good start on planning your dissertation research.  Ideally, you will have decided on your research topic, conducted a relevant review of literature, and/or carried out a pilot study before starting the written portion of the preliminary examination.  It is expected that the written portion of the preliminary exam helps you further develop your dissertation project.  After passing the Written Examination, you will write a dissertation proposal and prepare to defend your work before your Preliminary Examination Committee.

Dissertation research may be developed from the many possibilities related to your area of study and from a variety of research traditions.  The process of writing a dissertation proposal is challenging, but it provides unprecedented opportunities for creative and personally rewarding work.  In the past, students have found it helpful to draw on their studies to date and avail themselves of the advice and support of their committee chair and members, other faculty, and fellow students whenever possible. They have also joined a course in research design (e.g., EPSY 509) or one that offers specialized information necessary for their dissertation project (e.g., advanced statistics).

Dissertation proposals may take many forms and be of varying lengths.  The organization, content, and length of your proposal will be decided in collaboration with the Chair of your Preliminary Examination Committee.  We assume that these decisions reflect your involvement in a public discourse community and that you will follow the conventions within that research network. We can recommend a book such as Making the Implicit Explicit: Creating Performance Expectations for the Dissertation (by Barbara E. Lovitts), which fully describes the performance expectations of a quality dissertation, specifically, a dissertation that makes important new intellectual contributions to the given field of study. Of course, the writing style of a dissertation also needs to comply with the latest Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association.

When you and your committee chair(s) agree that the dissertation proposal is ready for review and approval, you will work with the Chair to distribute the proposal to members of your Preliminary Examination Committee and schedule the oral portion of the preliminary exam.  You should distribute this proposal to committee members for review at least three weeks before the scheduled exam date.  It is strongly recommended that you include a draft of the IRB application with the proposal.  As a rule, you should not submit the IRB application until after the oral portion of the examination is completed since a committee may make recommendations for changing research protocols during the exam.  See Section V for information about IRB requirements and procedures.

The readiness to defend a proposal is typically recorded when you initiate a formal Committee Recommendation Form with the Graduate College.  The Committee Recommendation Form may be obtained from the Graduate College’s website: http://grad.uic.edu/cms/?pid=1000329.  At the same time, you should ask the Office of Student Services (3145 ETMSW) for a degree checklist.  A list of the courses taken is available through the my.UIC portal: https://my.uic.edu/common/ . You must return the completed degree checklist with the signed Committee Recommendation Form to the Office of Student Services.  The completed form must be signed by the committee chairperson and submitted to the Office of Student Services at least three weeks before the date of the examination.

 

Step 3: Oral Portion of the Exam

The oral portion of the preliminary exam is primarily a hearing on your dissertation proposal, although it may also address aspects of the written examination and your readiness to complete dissertation research.  You are required to complete and pass the oral portion of the exam before beginning your dissertation research.  A primary function of the oral portion of the exam is committee approval of the dissertation research proposal.  It is highly recommended, but not required, that your Preliminary Examination Committee include the same members as the Dissertation Committee.  Evidence that you have moved to candidacy is obtained when all Preliminary Examination Committee members sign the document generated by the Graduate College for the oral examination and at least 3 of the 5 members indicate that you have passed the oral defense.

 

Guidelines for Evaluating the Preliminary Examination Process

The two written steps and the oral portions of the preliminary examination are each evaluated on a pass-fail basis.  It is common for students to be asked to make at least minor revisions in this process.  Yet, if two or more members of the Preliminary Examination Committee assign a failing grade to any portion of the exam, you will fail that portion.  If necessary, the entire portion of the exam or some element of that portion can be retaken once.  If you fail any portion of the exam you may be asked to do additional work or to revise your dissertation research plan before the committee gives final approval.  Even if a committee does not fail you on the oral portion of the exam, committee members may require you to make particular changes in the dissertation proposal before the proposal is approved.

Passing the oral portion of the preliminary exam and addressing all requests for revisions signifies that your committee members have given their approval for you to carry out your proposed dissertation research.  At this point, you become a doctoral candidate.  After reaching this point, you should be sure to submit the final version of the IRB application for approval (see Section V).  Before submitting this application to the IRB it is to be reviewed and signed by your committee chair and the chair of the Educational Psychology Department.

 
Proceeding to Dissertation Research (EPSY 599, 12 hours minimum)

After passing the oral portion of the preliminary examination and receiving approval from the IRB, you may begin your dissertation research.  The process of registering for courses and completing steps in the dissertation process are the same for all students in the College of Education, regardless of their program.  As noted in Section IV doctoral candidates face a number of new registration requirements and must adhere to the same professional standards required of all individuals conducting research (see Section V).  In addition to following all the guidelines in Section IV, the Educational Psychology program requires that you register for a minimum of 12 hours of dissertation credit during the time that you conduct and write up your research.

PhD in Policy Studies in Urban Education

The Ph.D. program in Policy Studies in Urban Education Program prepares students to conduct research on how educational institutions are organized, led, and improved, and on social and cultural contexts—particularly urban contexts—that influence these educational institutions.  Students engage in a focused yet flexible program of study that provides essential up-to-date knowledge, disciplinary and other theoretical perspectives, and research skills in one of two areas of concentration:  (a) educational organizations, leadership, and change; and (b) the social foundations of education. 

This program prepares students for academic research and teaching positions in colleges and universities, and research and policy positions in various education-related organizations at the local, state, and national levels.  Students who are interested in opportunities to earn the Illinois Type 75 General Administration Certificate or the Illinois Superintendent Endorsement should refer to the Ed.D. in Urban School Leadership described later in the handbook. 

Overview of Requirements (Fall 2013)

This Ph.D. in Policy Studies in Urban Education requires a minimum of 100 semester hours beyond the baccalaureate degree and a minimum of 68 semester hours beyond the master’s degree.  The program requires successful completion of courses in one of two areas of concentration, a comprehensive written qualifying examination, annual reviews, a preliminary examination, and a doctoral dissertation.  In consultation with and with approval of a faculty program advisor, you will prepare and follow an individual plan of study suited to your personal and professional interests and goals.  This program’s requirements are as follows for students who enter the program with an earned master’s degree. 

  • COE Doctoral Studies Core —12 hours
  • Methodology Requirement –-- 12 hours
  • Policy Studies in Urban Education Program Core --- 8 hours
  • Concentration-Specific Core Courses — 12-16 hours (minimum)
  • Elective Courses—8-12 hours (minimum)
  • Annual Reviews
  • Comprehensive Qualifying Examination
  • Preparation of a Dissertation Research Proposal
  • Preliminary Examination
  • Dissertation Research—12 hours (minimum)
  • Dissertation Defense

 

Students who enter with a bachelor’s degree but not a master’s degree must take additional hours of coursework equivalent to a master’s degree in research methods, policy, administration, leadership, and organization; social foundations coursework such as history, philosophy, sociology, and political science; or related fields such as gender studies, African-American studies, disability studies, or Latino studies.  Your plan of study is prepared in consultation with, and must be approved by, your faculty advisor.

Specific course requirements for each concentration within this program are listed below.  Following these lists are descriptions of elements of the program shared by both concentrations—annual reviews, the comprehensive qualifying examination, the dissertation proposal and preliminary examination, and the dissertation and dissertation defense.

 

1.  Concentration in Educational Organization and Leadership

Doctoral Studies Core (12 hours)

All doctoral degrees in the College of Education require a core of courses that focuses on different types of research in educational settings, research design, and the analysis of educational data.  These core courses will help you develop the minimum skills needed to evaluate research literature and to begin your own independent research.  You are encouraged to take these core courses early in your program; however, you may take other courses in the program before completing this set of courses. 

The requirements of the Doctoral Studies Core are:

  • ED 504—Urban Contexts and Educational Research (4 hours)
  • ED 505—Introduction to Educational Research: Paradigms and Processes (4 hours)
  • ED 506—Introduction to Educational Research: Designs and Analyses (4 hours)

 

Methodology Requirement (12 hours)

In addition to the Doctoral Studies Core above, you must take a minimum of three research methodology courses as described below.  Note also that you may choose or be encouraged by your faculty advisor to take additional courses in research methodology beyond these minimums in order to meet your personal scholarly and professional goals.

The Methodology Requirement includes:

  • ED 502—Essentials of Qualitative Inquiry in Education (4 hours)
  • ED 503/EPSY 503—Essentials of Quantitative Inquiry in Education (4 hours)
  • A third methodology course selected in consultation with your advisor (4 hours)
 
Policy Studies in Urban Education Core (8 hours)

To explore breadth in the field of Educational Policy Studies, all students, regardless of their concentration, enroll in three program core courses, totaling 8 semester hours.

  • EDPS 510 --- Introduction to Doctoral Education in Policy Studies (4 hrs)
  • EDPS 511 --- Introduction to Academic Writing in Educational Policy Studies (2 hrs)
  • EDPS 592 --- Professional Career Training in Education Policy Studies (2 hours)

 

EOL Concentration-Specific Core Courses (12 hours)

The concentration in Educational Organization and Leadership requires a core of field-specific courses that serve as a foundation for further study in the program and for investigation of specific problems in the leadership and administration of educational organizations and in educational improvement.  These core courses focus on the contexts of urban education, education policy processes, organization theory, and administrative and leadership theory:

  • EDPS 571—The Education Policy Process (4 hours)
  • EDPS 579—Organization Theory in Education (4 hours)
  • EDPS 589—Administrative and Leadership Theory in Education (4 hours)

 

Elective Courses (12 hours minimum)

You are required to take three elective courses within the College of Education chosen in consultation with your advisor.  Elective courses should be chosen to meet one or more of three criteria: (1) expand your breadth of study; (2) deepen your depth of study; or (3) enrich your study of research methodology.  You may draw on almost any course offered through the Policy Studies Department and may draw on courses offered by other departments to develop specialized expertise.  You may focus your work on elementary and secondary education or higher education.  Examples of courses you may choose include but are not limited to:

  • EDPS 453 — Topics in Educational Policy Studies (4 hours)
  • EDPS 501 — Education Finance and Budgeting (4 hours)
  • EDPS 568 — Education and the Law (4 hours)
  • EDPS 570 — Historical and Philosophical Analysis of Educational Policy (4 hours)
  • EDPS 574 —The Impact of College on Students (4 hours)
  • EDPS 575 — Higher Education Organization and Administration (4 hours)
  • EDPS 576 — History of Higher Education (4 hours)
  • EDPS 577 — American Academic Profession (4 hours)
  • EDPS 578 — Political Theory and Education Policy (4 hours)
  • EDPS 581 — Collective Bargaining in Education (4 hours)
  • EDPS 582 — Cultural Pluralism and Education Policy (4 hours)
  • EDPS 594 — Special Topics in Education Policy (4 hours, up to 8 hours)
  • CI 532 — Staff Development and School Improvement (4 hours)
  • CI 574 — Foundations of Curriculum Studies (4 hours)
  • ED 543 — Research on Teaching (4 hours)
  • EPSY 560 — Educational Program Evaluation (4 hours)

 

2. Concentration in Social Foundations of Education

Doctoral Studies Core (12 hours)

All doctoral degrees in the College of Education require a core of courses that focuses on different types of research in educational settings, research design, and the analysis of educational data.  These core courses will help you develop the minimum skills needed to evaluate research literature and to begin your own independent research.  You are encouraged to take these core courses early in your program; however, you may take other courses in the program before completing this set of courses. 

The requirements of the Doctoral Studies Core are:

  • ED 504—Urban Contexts and Educational Research (4 hours)
  • ED 505—Introduction to Educational Research: Paradigms and Processes (4 hours)
  • ED 506—Introduction to Educational Research: Designs and Analyses (4 hours)

 

Methodology Requirement (12 hours)

In addition to the Doctoral Studies Core above, you must take a minimum of three research methodology courses as described below.  Note also that you may choose or be encouraged by your faculty advisor to take additional courses in research methodology beyond these minimums in order to meet your personal scholarly and professional goals.

The Methodology Requirement includes:

  • ED 502—Essentials of Qualitative Inquiry in Education (4 hours)
  • ED 503/EPSY 503—Essentials of Quantitative Inquiry in Education (4 hours)
  • A third methodology course selected in consultation with your advisor (4 hours)

 

Policy Studies in Urban Education Core (8 hours)

To explore breadth in the field of Educational Policy Studies, all students, regardless of their concentration, enroll in three program core courses, totaling 8 semester hours.

  • EDPS 510 --- Introduction to Doctoral Education in Policy Studies (4 hrs)
  • EDPS 511 --- Introduction to Academic Writing in Educational Policy Studies (2 hrs)
  • EDPS 592 --- Professional Career Training in Education Policy Studies (2 hours)
 
Social Foundations in Education Concentration-Specific Core Courses (16 hours)

The concentration in Social Foundations of Education requires a core of field-specific courses that serve as a foundation for further study in the program and for investigation of specific problems on which you may focus your research.  These core courses focus on different contexts of urban education and provide an introduction to the academic disciplines and fields of study that undergird study of the social foundations of education.  The core courses include:

  • EDPS 505—Social Theory in Education Foundations (4 hours)

Plus three courses from among the following:

  • EDPS 500 — City Schools: Education in the Urban Environment (4 hours)
  • EDPS 502 — Advanced Foundational Studies in Philosophy of Education (4 hours)
  • EDPS 503 — History and Historiography in Education (4 hours)
  • EDPS 555 — Political Economy of Urban Education (4 hours)
  • EDPS 563 — Politics of Gender, Sexuality, & Education (4 hours)
  • EDPS 565 — Globalization & Education (4 hours)
  • EDPS 566 — Cultural Studies in Education (4 hours)
  • EDPS 567 — Economics of Education (4 hours)
  • EDPS 570 — Historical and Philosophical Analysis of Education Policy (4 hours)
  • EDPS 571 —The Education Policy Process (4 hours)
  • EDPS 572 — Sociology of Education (4 hours)
  • EDPS 582 — Cultural Pluralism and Education Policy (4 hours)
  • EDPS 583 — Women in Education (4 hours)
  • EDPS 588 — Critical Race Theory: Race and Racism in Education (4 hours)
  • EDPS 594 — Special Topics in Eduation Policy (1-4 hours, advisor approval)

 

Elective Courses (8 hours minimum)

You are required to take two elective courses within the College of Education to form a specialized area of study within the general area of social foundations of education.  Such courses may be in areas such as the history of education, sociology of education, philosophy of education, economics and politics of education, cultural studies in education, and so forth, and should be selected in consultation with your academic advisor.

 

Elements Shared by Both Concentrations

Annual Reviews

To monitor your progress effectively and to provide a vehicle through which you and your faculty advisors can reflect on your progress in a structured way, you are required to prepare and submit a formal review of progress each year.  Annual reviews are organized according to a program-wide template.  Your progress is reported to and discussed by the department faculty.  One element on which you are assessed is your engagement in professional activities in the scholarly community beyond coursework required by the program.  For this reason, you are encouraged to take advantage of opportunities for professional growth such as colloquia, conferences, and preparation of papers for publication. 

 

Comprehensive Qualifying Examination

Near the end or upon completion of your coursework, you must successfully complete a written comprehensive qualifying exam before proceeding to the dissertation stage of the program.  This examination will help you organize and focus ideas toward dissertation proposal development and research.  The exam is individually designed for you by your program advisor and program faculty members, who constitute a comprehensive examination committee.  Together, the committee members compose and approve the questions for the exam.  Questions will address your general knowledge of the field of concentration, your specialized knowledge within that field, and your use of research methods appropriate to research in that field. 

 
Preparing a Dissertation Proposal

A dissertation of independent, original research is required to complete the program.  The dissertation may be developed substantively from the many possibilities related to your area of specialization and from a variety of research traditions.  The process of writing a dissertation proposal is challenging, yet it provides unprecedented opportunities for creative, rewarding work.  Students often find that the best approach is to draw on their studies and to avail themselves of the advice and support of faculty advisors and fellow students in the program whenever possible.

In preparing your proposal for dissertation research, you should select a faculty member from the Educational Policy Studies Department to serve as your dissertation advisor and as chair of your preliminary examination and dissertation committees.  You should work with your chair to identify and recruit other faculty members to serve on your preliminary examination committee and on your dissertation committee (see below).  When you and your committee chairperson agree that your dissertation proposal is ready for review and approval, you are to work with your chair to distribute it to members of your preliminary examination committee and schedule your preliminary exam.  You should distribute your proposal to your committee members for review at least three weeks before the scheduled exam date.  It is also strongly recommended that you include in your proposal a draft of your IRB application.  As a rule, you should not submit your application to the IRB before the preliminary examination is completed because most committees make recommendations for changing research designs and protocols during the exam.  See Section V for information about IRB procedures and requirements.

 

The Preliminary Examination

The preliminary examination is taken after you have successfully completed all your coursework, your written comprehensive qualifying examination, and your dissertation proposal.  In this Ph.D. program, the preliminary examination is a hearing on your dissertation proposal and the means by which you receive committee approval to conduct your dissertation research.  While the preliminary examination is typically an oral hearing, preliminary examination committees may require that you respond in writing to questions and/or make revisions in your dissertation proposal as a condition of approval.  Passing the preliminary examination constitutes formal admission to candidacy for the Ph.D.

 

Forming a Preliminary Examination Committee

 

When you are ready to plan for your preliminary examination, you must find a faculty member to chair your preliminary examination committee.  Your faculty program advisor can help you with this task.  Your program advisor may serve as your committee chair or you may identify another faculty member whose interests and expertise may align more closely with your program of study and dissertation research.  You are to work with your committee chair to identify and recruit at least four other members to serve on your examination committee.  At least three members, including your chair, must be UIC faculty who are full members of the Graduate College.  Tenured or tenure-track faculty are usually full members of the Graduate College; clinical and visiting faculty generally are not.  At least two committee members must be tenured faculty in the College of Education faculty (i.e., associate professors or full professors).  Also, at least two members must be from the Educational Policy Studies Department.  The Graduate College does not require that the preliminary examination committee include a member from outside the department.  However, since the Graduate College does require that your dissertation committee have a member from outside the program (see Section IV), you may want to ask an outside member to be on your preliminary examination committee as well.

In order to formally constitute your preliminary examination committee, you must submit to the Graduate College a Committee Recommendation Form.  This form may be obtained from the Graduate College’s website: http://grad.uic.edu/cms/?pid=1000329.    At the same time, you should ask the Office of Student Services (3145 ETMSW) for a degree checklist.  A list of the courses taken is available through the my.UIC portal: https://my.uic.edu/common/ . You must return the completed degree checklist with the signed Committee Recommendation Form to the Office of Student Services.  The completed form must be signed by your committee chairperson and submitted to the Office of Student Services at least three weeks before the date of your examination.  Before submitting this form, you must be sure that the faculty members you identify to serve on your committee have agreed to serve.  If you want to include on your committee a member who is not on the faculty at UIC or is not a member of the UIC Graduate College, you must receive approval from the Graduate College.  This approval process is initiated when you submit your Committee Recommendation Form to the Office of Student Services.  A copy of this person’s full current curriculum vitae must be submitted with the Committee Recommendation Form.

 

Dissertation Research (EDPS 599, 12 hours minimum)

After passing the oral portion of the preliminary examination and receiving approval from the IRB, you may begin you dissertation research.  You must register for a minimum of 12 hours of dissertation credit during the time that you conduct and write up your study.  After you have registered for the minimum of 12 hours of dissertation credit and after you have passed both written and oral portions of the preliminary examination, you may petition the Graduate College to be permitted to register for 0 (zero) hours of dissertation credit.  If permission is granted, you may continue to register for 0 hours if you continue to make satisfactory progress and are within the time limits for completion of the degree.  Note that even if you are eligible and successfully petition the Graduate College to register for 0 hours, you still must register for 0 hours each semester until you have successfully defended the dissertation (although you do not need to register for 0 credits for the summer session unless the defense will be held during the summer).

The Graduate College makes an exception to the above registration requirement if the defense will occur during the late registration period for a term; in those cases, a doctoral defense will be allowed without student registration in that term.  This is assuming that you were registered the previous term, or the previous spring term in the instance of a fall defense (which should be the case since, as stated above, continuous registration is required).  The late registration period is the official first ten days of any fall or spring semester and the first five days of the summer term.  If you defend after the 10th day (5th in summer) you must be registered.

If you hold a fellowship, assistantship and/or tuition waiver, and do not resign from it, then registration is mandatory for the number of hours required to hold the award or assistantship.  If you hold a student visa, you probably do not have to register if you leave the country by the 10th day (5th in summer), although this should be verified with Office of International Services.

This (late period registration defense) exception does not affect the registration requirement to take the Preliminary Examination, or the general requirement of continuous registration from Preliminary Examination to defense.  Failure to register continuously may result in being administratively dropped from the program.  You should refer to Section IV for important additional information about constituting a dissertation committee and conducting dissertation research. 

 

Dissertation Defense

When you near the end of your dissertation research, you should begin to plan your dissertation defense with your dissertation committee chair.  See Section IV for specific information about organizing and scheduling your dissertation defense and filing all the paperwork required before the defense can be conducted.

According to Graduate College regulations, at least one year must pass between completing the oral portion of the preliminary examination and the dissertation defense.  If you fail to complete all program requirements, including the dissertation defense, within five years of passing the oral portion of the preliminary examination you must retake the preliminary examination.

EdD in Urban Education Leadership

The Ed.D. Program in Urban Education Leadership is nationally recognized for its innovation and quality and was identified as a “model” program by the Illinois Board of Higher Education Blue Ribbon Commission on School Leader Preparation in 2007. It has received the Council of Great City Schools Urban Impact Award and the inaugural Exemplary School Leadership Preparation Program award from the University Council of Education Administration, and is today (2013) the only higher education program to be recognized as Exemplary by the Bush Institute Alliance to reform Education Leadership.  The Ed.D. program is designed to prepare and develop principals who are able to lead significantly improved teaching and learning in urban schools. The program seeks applicants who are outstanding teachers and instructional leaders seeking to transition to principal positions, as well as principals desiring to take their schools to the next level. This intensive, highly-selective cohort model combines coursework with supervised practicum experiences and an emphasis on collaborative data collection and analysis at the school level. With additional coursework and fieldwork beyond the Illinois P-12 Principal Endorsement, the program supports the continued development of novice principals and also prepares system-level leaders who will lead school improvement at the district level.

 

Overview of Program Requirements (Fall 2013)

Incoming students must complete either 80 credit hours to obtain the Ed.D. or 96 hours to obtain the Ed.D. with Superintendent Endorsement. In both cases, these credits include coursework that addresses research, policy, and practice. Coursework is integrated with field experiences to develop leadership capacities consistent with the Ed.D.  A Certificate of Advanced Studies (CAS) is available for those who do not complete the Ed.D., but who have completed the residency, 64 credit hours of prescribed course work, and a comprehensive examination.

All options require successful completion of coursework, annual reviews, and a comprehensive written qualifying examination:  Additionally, the Ed. D requires a preliminary exam and a doctoral research project.  The Illinois Superintendent Endorsement requires an additional 16 hours beyond the Ed. D degree.

 

For All Students:

  • Urban Education Leadership Coursework — 64 hours.
  • Annual Reviews
  • Comprehensive Qualifying Examination

For Ed.D Students:

            All items above, plus:

  • EDPS 544 – Research Design in Educational Policy Studies (4 hours)
  • Preliminary Examination on a Capstone Project Proposal
  • Professional Capstone Inquiry — (EDPS 591) 12 hours

For Superintendent Endorsement:

All items above, plus:

  • Additional Required Courses – 12 hours
  • Additional Selective Course – 4 hours

 

Elements Shared Across All Options

Urban Education Leadership Coursework (64 hours)

You must take the 64 hours of courses required below to pursue any of the Urban Education Leadership degree or certificate options.  Please consult your program advisor for sequencing and scheduling requirements. 

  • CI/EDPS 548 — Leading Improvement of Literacy Learning (4 hours)
  • EDPS 550 — Improving Education Organizations (4 hours)
  • EDPS 551 --- Cycles of Inquiry for Improving Schools (4 hours)
  • EDPS 552 — Leading Urban Schools (4 hours)
  • EDPS 556 — Leading Classroom Diagnostics and Interventions (4 hours)
  • EDPS 557 --- Developing Organizational and Leadership Capacity (4 hours)
  • EDPS 558 --- Leading Improvement of Mathematics Learning (4 hours)
  • EDPS 559 --- Internship in Education Leadership (8 hours)
  • EDPS 568 --- Education and the Law (4 hours)
  • EDPS 571 --- The Education Policy Process (4 hours)
  • EDPS 579 --- Organization Theory in Education (4 hours)
  • EDPS 586 –-  Practitioner Inquiry for School Leaders (8 hours)
  • EDPS 592 –- Professional Career Training in Education Policy Studies (4 hours)
  • EPSY 535 --- Human Development for School Leaders (4 hours)

 

Annual Reviews

To monitor your progress effectively and to provide a vehicle through which you and your faculty advisor can reflect on your progress in a structured way, you are required to prepare and submit a formal review of progress each year.  Annual reviews are organized according to a program-wide template.  Your progress is reported to and discussed by the department faculty.  One element on which you are assessed is your engagement in professional activities in the professional community beyond coursework required by the program.  For this reason, you are encouraged to take advantage of opportunities for professional growth outside the program, such as colloquia, conferences, preparation of papers for presentation and publication, and leadership roles. 

 

Comprehensive Qualifying Examination

Successful completion of the written comprehensive exam is required for completion of the CAS and entry into the Capstone Project stage of the Ed.D. program.  If you have a cumulative GPA below 3.00 or more than two courses remaining to complete you will not be permitted to take the qualifying examination. The exam will include a review of a portfolio of annual performance assessments designated by program faculty.

The comprehensive exam assesses your demonstrated ability to communicate doctoral-level thinking in three broad domains of leadership theory and practice: leadership for school improvement; establishing information systems at the school level; and demonstrating evidence of leadership performance.

The comprehensive qualifying exam is graded on a “pass-fail” basis.  If you fail the exam or a portion of the exam you have one opportunity to re-take the exam or the failed portion.  The re-take must be completed successfully within one se,ester for you to remain in the program.  Students who fail to pass all components after the second attempt are likely to be recommended by the program faculty to the Graduate College for dismissal from the program.

 

Continuing on to the Ed.D.

Successful completion of the above requirements qualifies a student to receive a Certificate of Advanced Studies (CAS) in Urban Education Leadership.  To attain the Ed.D degree, additional coursework and a capstone doctoral research project are required.

 

Preparing a Capstone Proposal (EDPS 544 – 4 hours)

The Professional Capstone Inquiry Project is the culminating demonstration of professional expertise in contrast to a traditional dissertation for the Ed.D. program.

The project is to be a “case of” leadership and the initiation, development, and management of organizational improvement processes. The primary focus is not individual programs, policies, practices, and other initiatives that might be generated by those processes (e.g., particular curricular initiatives, parent involvement programs, strategies for improving school climate, etc.). Instead, the primary focus is to be on turn-around processes, cycles of inquiry, or processes of continuous improvement, or other organizational improvement processes initiated in a school.  Individual programs, practices, and other initiatives would receive attention in terms of how those broader organizational processes are working, what they are producing, and why.

You are to develop your capstone project proposal as part of your work in EDPS 544.  In preparing your proposal, you should select a faculty member from the Educational Policy Studies Department to serve as your project advisor and as chair of your preliminary examination and project defense committees.  You are encouraged to consult with your project advisor and other faculty in the program to develop ideas and plans for your project. 

 

The Preliminary Examination

The preliminary examination is taken at the completion of all coursework. The exam is an oral defense of a written Doctoral Professional Capstone Inquiry Project proposal. The primary purpose of the preliminary examination is review and approval of the Doctoral Capstone Project proposal for admission of the student to Ed.D. candidacy.

Preliminary exams to defend the capstone proposal are typically conducted in the spring of each year by a five-member faculty committee, three of whom will work with you through the final capstone project defense.  While typically an oral hearing, the committee may require that you respond in writing to questions and/or make revisions in your capstone project proposal as a condition of approval.  Passing the preliminary examination constitutes formal admission to candidacy for the Ed.D.

In order to formally constitute your preliminary examination committee, you must submit to the Graduate College a Committee Recommendation Form.  This form may be obtained from the Graduate College’s website: http://grad.uic.edu/cms/?pid=1000329.    At the same time, you should ask the Office of Student Services (3145 ETMSW) for a degree checklist.  A list of the courses you have taken is available through the my.UIC portal: https://my.uic.edu/common/ . You must return the completed degree checklist with the signed Committee Recommendation Form to the Office of Student Services.  The completed form must be signed by your capstone advisor and submitted to the Office of Student Services at least three weeks before the date of your examination

 

Professional Capstone Inquiry Project (EDPS 591, 12 hours)

After passing the preliminary examination you may begin your capstone inquiry project.  You must register for a minimum of 12 hours of EDPS 591—Professional Capstone Inquiry while completing your project.   

The project calls for students to perform the following inquiry and analytic tasks:

  • Describe the initial “theory-of-action” of leadership in the initiation, development, and management of organizational change processes in a school.  A “theory-of-action” is a statement of intention that includes definitions of key elements (e.g., leadership in the particular context) and explanations of why specific intended actions will lead to intended outcomes.
  • Describe, document, and reconstruct as necessary leadership practices, the development of organizational change processes in the school from past to present states, and factors or conditions presumed to play a role, that is, the “theory-in-use.”  This is a construction of what actually happened, as distinct from what was intended.
  • Explain the relationship of leadership practices and antecedent and moderating factors to the development of organizational change processes using theoretical, empirical, and professional literatures and existing data from the school and school district.
  • From this analysis and using this literature, project and provide a rationale for next steps for leadership in developing and managing organizational change processes.

Data that are publicly available and that do not violate FERPA regulations include, for example:  (a) state school report card data on demographics and aggregate student performance on standardized tests; (b) district school report card data on student attendance, teacher attendance, and other markers of school culture and climate; (c) data on school-based practices, procedures, systems, and structures as they existed at point A in a principal’s tenure and as they existed at points B, C, etc. in that tenure; (d) publicly accessible school-based documents (e.g., CIWP document and principals’ memos, that indicate the need, plans, and strategies for implementing change; (e) Consortium on Chicago School Research and CPS school survey data on the CPS Five Fundamentals.  

 

Project Defense

You are required to defend your Professional Capstone Inquiry Project before the review committee as described above.  Defenses are typically scheduled at the end of the fall and spring semesters each academic year. 

 

Illinois Superintendent Endorsement

If you wish to add the Illinois Superintendent Endorsement to your Ed.D. degree you must complete the following additional 16 hours of coursework:

Required Endorsement Coursework (12 hours)

  • EDPS 553 — Leading Urban School Systems (4 hours)
  • EDPS 589 — Administrative and Leadership Theory in Education (4 hours)
  • EDPS 592 --- Professional Career Training in Education Policy Studies (4 hours)

 

Selective Endorsement Coursework (4 hours)

Students must complete one of the following courses

  • EDPS 412 — Politics of Urban Education (4 hours)
  • EDPS 567 — Economics of Education (4 hours)
  • EDPS 581 --- Collective Bargaining in Education (4 hours)

 

PhD Dissertation Research

Each Ph.D. program in the College of Education requires that you conduct and complete independent dissertation research that will make original contributions to the scholarly and/or professional knowledge of the field.  This research may employ different methodologies and proceed from different paradigms of inquiry.  The College of Education collaborates with the Graduate College to ensure that all doctoral research is of high intellectual rigor and quality and meets the highest ethical and professional standards of the field.  That process involves a number of procedural guidelines that are outlined on the Graduate College's Web site (http://grad.uic.edu/cms/?pid=1000025) and/or as part of the Thesis Manual (http://grad.uic.edu/cms/?pid=1000027).  This section provides information about dissertation research that applies to all Ph.D.programs; note that requirements for the Ed.D. Doctoral Capstone Inquiry Project are described separately in section IV.-B. below. 

 

Making Changes Along the Way…

As a doctoral candidate, you will work with your dissertation chair and other members of your dissertation committee as you conduct your research. However, you should also become more independent as your research progresses.  If you wish to make any changes to the research protocols that were approved by the IRB you should make sure to file an amendment form and get approval before those changes are put into effect.  It is imperative that you follow the IRB guidelines as you complete your research, including continuing education updates, annual renewals if approved protocols span multiple years, and closing out your research protocol once your research is complete.  Guidelines for the Human Subjects Protection Program and these responsibilities as researchers are posted at: http://tigger.uic.edu/depts/ovcr/research/protocolreview/irb/getting_started.shtml

 

Registration Guidelines for Doctoral Candidates

Continuous Registration

During the time in which you are working on your dissertation, you must maintain continuous registration in the University.  After having completed coursework and the preliminary examination process, if you have accumulated the number of dissertation credit hours required by your program you may petition the Graduate College to register for 0 (zero) credit hours.  Being able to register for 0 hours represents a substantial reduction in tuition and fee costs, but programs are beginning to place restrictions on how many of these hours you can acquire as you complete your degree.  Petitions are available in the College of Education Office of Student Services (3145 ETMSW).

If permission is granted, you may continue to register for 0 hours if you continue to make satisfactory progress and are within the time limits for completion of the degree.  Note that even if you are eligible and successfully petition the Graduate College to register for 0 hours, you still must register for 0 hours each semester until you have successfully defended the dissertation (although you do not need to register for 0 credits for the summer session unless the defense will be held during the summer).

The Graduate College makes an exception to the above registration requirement if the defense will occur during the late registration period for a term; in those cases, a doctoral defense will be allowed without student registration in that term.  This is assuming that you were registered the previous term, or the previous spring term in the instance of a fall defense (which should be the case since, as stated above, continuous registration is required).  The late registration period is the official first ten days of any fall or spring semester and the first five days of the summer term.  If you defend after the 10th day (5th in summer) you must be registered.

If you hold a fellowship, assistantship and/or tuition waiver, and do not resign from it, then registration is mandatory for the number of hours required to hold the award or assistantship.  If you hold a student visa, you probably do not have to register if you leave the country by the 10th day (5th in summer), although this should be verified with Office of International Services.

This (late period registration defense) exception does not affect the registration requirement to take the Preliminary Examination, or the general requirement of continuous registration from Preliminary Examination to defense.  Failure to register continuously may result in being administratively dropped from your program. 

 

Registration When Graduating

When you are preparing to defend your dissertation, a series of additional registration steps are important to follow.  First, at the beginning of the semester, you must complete an Intent to Graduate form by the deadline posted for the semester.  Second, you should ensure that your Committee Recommendation form paperwork, including the curriculum vitae of any members who are not already members of UIC's Graduate College, has been completed and turned into Office of Student Services.  Without exception, this paperwork is to be completed no later than three weeks prior to a final defense.  Given that all Dissertation Committee members should have at least three weeks to read your dissertation, it is also a good idea to schedule the defense and distribute the full dissertation to committee members at the same time.  If, for some reason, members of a doctoral committee decide that you are not ready to defend your dissertation, the paperwork generated by the Graduate College for the final defense will be placed in your file in the Office of Student Services until the defense is scheduled. 

The dates for submitting a final thesis to the Graduate College in order to finish in the semester when the thesis is defended are posted on the Graduate College Web site (http://grad.uic.edu/cms/?pid=1000025).  If you are scheduled to defend your thesis during late registration (the first ten days of the semester, the first five days of the summer term), the Graduate College will allow you to avoid registering for a new semester's worth of doctoral credits.  This is assuming that you were registered for the term prior to your defense.  More information on these conditional activities can be found on the Graduate College Web site at (http://grad.uic.edu/cms/?pid=1000024).  Similarly, if you hold an international student visa, you may not have to register if you leave the country by the 10th day of term (5th in summer).  Because such rules may vary by country, you should verify this with Office of International Services (http://www.ois.uic.edu/)

 

Forming the Ph.D. Dissertation Committee

Given that you are required to complete a dissertation to earn your Ph.D., and that this dissertation is directed and ultimately must be accepted by a committee of 5 faculty members, the process of establishing your dissertation committee is important.  It is common for a student to establish one committee of 5 faculty members who serve both as members of their Preliminary Examination Committee (see specific program requirements for those regulations) and their Doctoral Dissertation Committee.  It is also common for the Chair of each committee to be the same person.  Nevertheless, for a wide range of reasons, you may need to form a new committee after becoming a doctoral candidate, replace individual members on a committee, or otherwise adjust this process.  You may also need to replace some members of your Preliminary Examination Committee with other faculty members because they bring expertise more germane to the dissertation research or to address the fact that members of the Preliminary Examination Committee moved, took on other responsibilities, or retired from serving on doctoral committees.

Specifically, once you have passed the varied steps of your preliminary examination, your dissertation proposal has been approved by your Preliminary Examination Committee, and you have obtained any necessary approvals from the Institutional Review Board (IRB) (http://tigger.uic.edu/depts/ovcr/research/protocolreview/irb/getting_started.shtml), you are ready to begin your dissertation research.  Working with the Doctoral Dissertation Committee Chair as part of the preliminary examination process, you will have started the formation of a dissertation committee.  It is important to form your dissertation committee early in the dissertation process, obtaining an agreement to serve from each member and using all members of the committee as a resource throughout the research process.  To make this committee formal, you must submit a Committee Recommendation Form no later than three weeks before your dissertation defense date.  The completed, signed Committee Recommendation Form should be submitted to the College of Education Office of Student Services (3145 ETMSW).  It can be obtained here: http://grad.uic.edu/cms/?pid=1000329.  Upon approval from the Graduate College, the dissertation committee is officially constituted as the Doctoral Dissertation Defense Committee.

 

Guidelines for the Composition of the Ph.D. Dissertation Committee

To pass the Graduate College review, your dissertation committee must have at least five members, including one member from outside your program.  Unlike the Preliminary Examination Committee, the dissertation committee must include a member from outside the Program.  If you have not selected an outside member for your Preliminary Examination Committee, you must add one to your Doctoral Dissertation Committee.  Programs also have requirements; you should meet those as well. (See program descriptions in section III).

The Chair of the Doctoral Dissertation Committee must be a full member of the Graduate College and at least two committee members must be tenured faculty at UIC.  The committee must also have a member who works outside the department in which the Ph.D. program is housed or outside the University.  To include someone from outside the University, that person’s membership must be approved by the Graduate College.  Approval from the Graduate College must also be obtained if you wish to include individuals from UIC who are not members of the UIC Graduate College.  To include someone who is not a member of the UIC Graduate College, the approval process is initiated by submitting the outside person's full curriculum vitae to the College of Education's Office of Student Services when the Committee Recommendation Form is submitted.  All members of a Doctoral Dissertation Committee, like the Preliminary Examination Committee, must hold terminal degrees in their field of expertise.  Obviously, before submitting the Committee Recommendation Form, you must be sure that each faculty member has agreed to serve on the committee and that the Dissertation Committee Chair supports all these decisions.

 

The Ph.D. Dissertation Defense

When you and your Chair believe that your dissertation is ready for a defense, you and members of the Dissertation Defense Committee will schedule a date, time, and place for the hearing.  In scheduling this hearing, you should give the members of the Dissertation Defense Committee at least three weeks to read and review the completed dissertation.  If you have not already done so, the Dissertation Defense Committee is formally constituted by submitting the Committee Recommendation Form and the curriculum vitae of any members who are not members of the Graduate College to the Office of Student Services.  This step must be completed at least three weeks before the defense.

When you distribute a completed dissertation to your committee members, you must also submit a copy to the department's Director of Graduate Studies (DGS).  Along with this version of the dissertation, the DGS will need the approved IRB protocol, any approved amendments, and a blank copy of consent and assent forms used for your research.  The main purpose of the DGS review is to make sure that any assurances that were made to research participants about anonymity and confidentiality are honored in the final write-up.  The DGS will notify the Dissertation Defense Committee Chair if there are issues that need to be addressed, and will inform the Office of Student Services once this review has been satisfactory.

A copy of the dissertation abstract with information about the time and place of the dissertation defense should also be submitted to the Office of Student Services as soon as a final dissertation defense is scheduled. Because the dissertation defense is a public hearing and is open to any member of the University’s academic community who wishes to attend, the abstract will be duplicated and posted to announce this exam.  It should be remembered that this event is an examination in which you will be required to defend the quality of your thesis and your readiness to formally enter into the profession.

Your dissertation will not pass the final defense if more than one committee member fails to approve the dissertation.  You should be aware that dissertation committees often require additional work on the dissertation before the committee gives its final approval.  When scheduling the defense, it is important to remember that along with completing and obtaining approval for any changes, there are a number of other steps required by the Graduate College before submitting the final dissertation.

 

When It’s All Over but the Shouting…

Once you have successfully defended your dissertation and completed any revisions or additional work required by the committee, the Graduate College requires that you complete a number of steps.  These steps must be completed by the "Last Day for Graduate College Approval of Thesis Format," established by the Graduate College each semester.  This date is listed in the Graduate Catalog, is circulated widely around the College each term, and is posted online at: http://grad.uic.edu/cms/?pid=1000222.  If you miss this deadline, your graduation will be delayed until the next semester.  In preparing your dissertation for submission to the Graduate College, you must follow the format rules outlined in The University of Illinois at Chicago Graduate College Thesis Manual (http://grad.uic.edu/cms/?pid=1000329). 

In order to graduate, you must submit a Pending Degree List form electronically via the my.UIC Web Portal: https://my.uic.edu/common/  The Pending Degree List form may only be submitted from the start of registration in your graduation semester until the Friday of the third week of fall and spring semesters or the second week of the summer semester.  After that date the Pending Degree List will be unavailable.  Deadlines may be found online at: http://grad.uic.edu/cms/?pid=1000030.  Filing this form triggers an assessment by the Office of Student Services to ensure that you have completed all degree requirements satisfactorily and that you are indeed eligible to graduate. 

Although you will want to check with the Graduate College Web site for any changes, the current checklist for steps needed to graduate is as follows:

Checklist for Completion of Graduation - Doctoral Candidates

_____ Apply for graduation for term during the term registration period, through the third week (second week in summer) of the term.  The Intent to Graduate is online and available at https://grad.uic.edu/cms/?pid=1000363 , or through the my.UIC Web Portal: https://my.uic.edu/common/, or the Student Self-Service at https://apps.uillinois.edu/

_____ Finalize any issues with formation of my Defense Committee with department

_____ Verify with department that my preference for my name and thesis title are correctly typed on the Committee Recommendation Form

_____ Verify with department that they submit the Committee Recommendation Form to the Graduate College a minimum three weeks before proposed defense date

_____ Write an abstract of the dissertation – do not include within body of dissertation

_____ After successful defense, verify that the Examination Report and the Certificates of Approval are endorsed by the Chairperson, Department Head, and members of the committee

_____ Obtain fully endorsed Certificates of Approval from department (Examination Report should be sent to the Graduate College by your program within forty-eight hours of defense)

_____ Submit final defended dissertation to thesis advisor or departmental designee for format approval, making any corrections as they may indicate

_____Obtain endorsed Departmental/Program Format Approval Form after format cleared by program

_____ Place the Certificates of Approval as the top page of each dissertation

_____ Make three additional copies of the title page, totaling five, counting the two in dissertation

_____ Place the two copies of completed, final dissertation (with Certificates of Approval) into individual manila envelopes

_____ Pay the $65 (for traditional) or $160 (for open access) publishing fee, subject to change, at the cashier in the Marshfield Building and photocopy receipt for inclusion with submitted dissertation to the Graduate College

_____ Pick up Dissertation Publishing Agreement and Survey of Earned Doctorates from Graduate College or at https://grad.uic.edu/cms/?pid=1000363

_____ Complete Dissertation Publishing Agreement (mandatory) and Survey of Earned Doctorates (mandatory, but may write “refused” next to a specific question you do not wish to answer)

_____ Obtain certified check or money-order for copyright (optional) and/or for ordering bound copies of dissertation (optional – see Dissertation Publishing Agreement)

_____ Bring two copies of dissertation (with Certificates of Approval) in manila envelopes to the Graduate College, by the submission deadline – see http://grad.uic.edu/cms/?pid=1000222.  Also, bring the three extra title pages, separate abstract, the Departmental/Program Format Approval Form, the photocopy of the microfilm fee receipt, Dissertation Publishing Agreement with any certified check(s) or money-order(s) for copyright and/or for ordering bound copies of dissertation, and the Survey of Earned Doctorates. All of these miscellaneous pages should be placed in a third manila envelope.

_____ Upon submission of above material to the Graduate College, complete three Thesis/Dissertation Student Information Labels and affix to the front of the three manila envelopes (or pick up earlier and affix)

_____ If contacted for corrections to the dissertation, bring them to the Graduate College by deadline given by reviewer

_____ A few weeks after the term ends and grades are posted a congratulatory letter will be received, assuming all requirements are completed, or notification of a problem

EdD Capstone Research

At UIC, as in other research institutions, the professional doctorate is distinguished from the research doctorate in several ways.  For example, professional doctorates in Medicine (MD), or Occupational Therapy (OTD), or Education (Ed.D.) are different from the Ph.D. in that the goal is not to prepare and develop researchers, but to prepare and develop the highest level of practitioner in each respective field.  The final or capstone demonstration of knowledge and skills In these fields is therefore not a research dissertation, but a demonstration of other kinds of professional practice capacities. With permission, an Ed.D. student may elect to write a Ph.D.-style research dissertation, but the degree will remain an Ed.D. 

UIC’s Ed.D. Program is grounded in the view that the highest levels of professional practice in school leadership require advanced capacities in practitioner inquiry—capacities for asking the right questions in organizational change efforts, pursuing the right information to answer them, analyzing the information collected, and using the results of that analysis in effective ways.  These are among the core capacities that we seek to develop in the Ed.D. Program. The final capstone project is a demonstration of disciplined practitioner inquiry that integrates practice with theory, research, and analytic skills and dispositions.  More specifically, the capstone thesis is intended to be a case study of the processes and outcomes of organizational change intended to improve student learning.  Most candidates focus on their schools as the organizations to be studied, but students working at the district level may choose to focus on the district or portion of the district as the case.

Ed.D. capstones typically do not require normal IRB approval.  Instead, each semester the EDPS department submits an IRB Determination Form to determine whether any of the capstone projects scheduled for proposal defense that semester require formal human subjects review.  Typically, this determination process identifies capstone studies as not requiring formal review because the cases are constructed with publicly available data that does not require participation of human subjects.

Ed.D. capstone inquiry is therefore different from Ph.D. dissertation research, yet similar in a number of ways.  For example, the thesis proposal and completed capstone project will be evaluated and approved by the doctoral candidate's capstone advisor and a faculty committee, but for the Ed.D. capstone, the final defense committee is three members, not five.  And similar to the dissertation process, the Policy Studies Department supports the doctoral candidate’s formal constitution of this committee by submitting the Committee Recommendation Form to the Office of Student Services at least three weeks before the proposal defense and the final capstone defense.

When Ed.D. candidates distribute their completed capstone to committee members prior to the final defense, they must also submit a copy to the College of Education Office of Student Services for review by the Policy Studies Director of Graduate Studies (DGS). Along with the thesis, doctoral candidates must submit an approved IRB protocol, or any approved determinations or amendments, and a blank copy of consent and assent forms if they were used in the study.  The main purpose of the DGS review is to make sure that OPRS Determination procedures were followed, and that any assurances that were made to research participants about anonymity and confidentiality are honored in the final write-up.  The DGS will notify your capstone committee chair if there are issues that need to be addressed.

A candidate’s capstone project cannot be approved by the review committee if more than one committee member fails to approve the thesis.  You should be aware that it is not uncommon for review committees to require that additional work on the capstone be done before the committee gives its final approval. 

Although Ed.D. students will want to check with the EDPS capstone advisor for any changes, the current checklist for steps needed to graduate  is as follows:

 

Checklist for Completion of Graduation - Doctoral Candidates

_____ Apply for graduation for term during the term registration period, through the third week (second week in summer) of the term.  The Intent to Graduate is online and available at https://grad.uic.edu/cms/?pid=1000363 , or through the my.UIC Web Portal: https://my.uic.edu/common/, or the Student Self-Service at https://apps.uillinois.edu/

_____ Finalize any issues with formation of my Defense Committee with department

_____ Verify with department that my preference for my name and capstone project title are correctly typed on the Committee Recommendation Form

_____ Verify with department that they submit the Committee Recommendation Form to the Graduate College a minimum three weeks before proposed defense date

_____ Write an abstract of the capstone –include with the body of the capstone as a separate document, just as the red-bordered Certificates of Approval and other documents will later be included

_____ After successful defense, verify that the Examination Report and the Certificates of Approval are endorsed by the Chairperson, Department Head, and members of the committee

_____ Obtain fully endorsed Certificates of Approval from department (Examination Report should be sent to the Graduate College by your program within forty-eight hours of defense)

_____ Submit final defended capstone project to advisor or departmental designee for format approval, making any corrections as they may indicate

_____Obtain endorsed Departmental/Program Format Approval Form after format cleared by program

_____ Place the Certificates of Approval as the top page of each copy of the capstone

_____ Place three copies of completed, final capstone (with Certificates of Approval) into individual manila envelopes:  one of these identical copies is for the student, one for the EDPS Department, and one for the project advisor.

_____ A few weeks after the term ends and grades are posted a congratulatory letter will be received, assuming all requirements are completed, or notification of a problem

The Institutional Review Board

Issues pertaining to the ethical conduct of research receive repeated attention throughout all of the College’s doctoral programs.  One important ethical consideration has to do with the rights of human subjects who participate in our studies.  Because this issue is so important, the University requires that all research involving human subjects be reviewed by the Institutional Review Board (IRB) of the University.  Operated by the Office of Protection of Research Subjects (OPRS), the IRB consists of three panels of faculty and community members.  Every research study involving human subjects is reviewed by one of these panels, or in some cases, a subset of its members, in order to determine whether the study meets rigorous ethical standards.  Depending on the degree of risk to subjects in the study, the research may require an initial review by the College of Education’s Departmental Review Committee (DRC). 

Most students in the College of Education engage in dissertation and thesis research involving human subjects.  Some also do research involving human subjects at other times during their graduate work, for example, in a course, an independent study, or a research project.  In every instance of research involving human subjects, IRB approval is required prior to the commencement of the research and collection of data.

Before you submit an application and research protocol for IRB approval, you must first complete the University’s education requirement for investigators and key research personnel.  You can satisfy this requirement either by taking an online course or by attending a special training session.  After the initial training requirement is met, you must enroll in continuing education sessions in order to continue conducting human subject research (see the OPRS website for the current requirement: http://tigger.uic.edu/depts/ovcr/research/protocolreview/irb/education/index.shtml).   Dates for the initial and continuing education sessions are listed on the OPRS website. This site also includes other important information about IRB matters.  It is a good idea to check it periodically to make sure that you are aware of any changes in requirements.

After you have completed IRB training, you may begin drafting your IRB application on the appropriate forms.  It is important to begin the process of securing IRB approval well in advance of when you will need to start your research.  IRB reviews take time to complete.  Application forms are available on the OPRS website (http://tigger.uic.edu/depts/ovcr/research/protocolreview/irb/forms/index.shtml).

As a student at the university, you must have a faculty member who has fulfilled the education requirement for human subjects investigators agree to be your faculty sponsor for your research.  For dissertation research, your sponsor is your dissertation chair.  Your faculty sponsor will discuss with you the different categories of review and help you decide which is most appropriate for your research.  All protocols must be accompanied by documents demonstrating how you, the researcher, will gain consent of subjects and how the confidentiality of subjects will be protected.  Copies of recruitment materials and consent forms must accompany your application.  There is a template for a consent form on the OPRS website.  While you do not have to follow this template format exactly, your consent form must include the same information, in roughly the same order.  Copies of all research instruments must also be submitted.  If a formal research proposal exists that describes the research proposed in the protocol (e.g., a dissertation proposal or grant proposal), it must be included with your application.  If there is no formal research proposal, it is necessary to include a short description (3-5 pages long) of the proposed research.

After you have your IRB protocol signed by your faculty sponsor and reviewed and signed by the Chair of your program, you have two possible routes to follow.  If the research requires a full review, it must first be reviewed by the College of Education’s DRC.  If the protocol requires other levels of review, that is, exempt or expedited, it may be sent directly to the Office for Protection of Research Subjects (OPRS) for review. 

The DRC consists of faculty members from each department of the College.  The DRC meets monthly to review protocols.  It is important to submit your application before the deadline for that month’s review.  You may obtain a schedule of DRC meeting dates from your advisor.

When you receive your approval letter from the IRB, a copy of the letter and the approved IRB application should be filed in the College of Education (3343 ETMSW) so that the College has a record of your approval.  If you later submit any amendments to your application to the IRB (see below), a copy of the approved amendments and the letter approving them should be given to the College as well.

After you obtain IRB approval, you may begin your research.  However, approval is good only for a maximum of one year.  If your research extends beyond one year, even if you are only analyzing data from the study, you must receive approval from the IRB to continue.  The form for continuing review is available on the OPRS website.  If you change any aspect of your research methodology, you must file an amendment to your approved application.  The form and instructions for submitting an amendment are also available at the OPRS website.  It is critical that you obtain approval for any changes to an IRB protocol prior to enacting the changes.  If, for example, you have not received approval for changes to your dissertation study, you will not be able to pass your dissertation defense.  When you have completed your research, you need to complete a final continuing review form, marking it on the front as “final report,” to submit it to OPRS.  This lets OPRS know that your research protocol is no longer current. 

Students usually understand that IRB approval is necessary for dissertation research involving human subjects.  However, they are sometimes unsure whether IRB approval is needed for inquiries they might conduct at other points in their programs, for example, in a course, an independent study, or a research project.  Several courses you will take in your program will address this, and, of course, your faculty advisor can help you decide when IRB approval is necessary.  As a general rule, if you undertake a project in order to acquire skills in research methodology, you do not need IRB approval.  However, if the project involves human subjects and is more than training or learning to do research, and if you might present your findings at a local or national conference, publish them, or include them in your dissertation as pilot data, then you must obtain IRB approval. 

In some cases, a student project or dissertation does not require IRB review, although a form (“Approval Form for Students Projects and Dissertations that Do Not Involve Research and/or Human Subjects as Defined by Federal Regulations”) must still be completed.  IRB review is not required for research involving persons who are not considered “human subjects.”  For example, your research may focus on persons who are no longer living.  If the research does not require interaction with any living persons, it may fit this category.  This category also includes research on living individuals if you do not personally interact with them and have no access to information that reveals their identity.  If your research fits this category, you do not need IRB approval, but you do need to register your research.  Consult the OPRS website: http://tigger.uic.edu/depts/ovcr/research/protocolreview/irb/policies/index.shtml for information on how to determine whether research meets the requirements for this category.  IRB review is also not required if your work does not involve persons or human subjects, or is not considered research as defined by federal regulations.

If your research does not require IRB review, the required approval form is available in room 3343 ETMSW.  The completed form must be signed by your faculty sponsor and returned to 3343 ETMSW.  Before you begin your work, the form must be reviewed and approved by the DRC chair.

Learning about the ethics of doing research, including how to obtain IRB approval when appropriate, is an integral feature of the College’s doctoral programs.  The DRC Chair will schedule appointments to address any questions you might have about the process.

The UIC Library and Educational Technology Lab

The UIC Library

One of the most valuable resources for your doctoral studies is the UIC Library.  The UIC Library contains more than one million books and bound periodicals.  In addition, electronic journals and other electronic resources are available through the library’s website: http://library.uic.edu/  Online research guides and a form for requesting an individual appointment with a librarian for research assistance are offered through the library.

While any librarian or library staff members can be helpful in answering your questions about the library and resources for your research, there is also a librarian who is dedicated to assisting those associated with the College of Education: 

Annie Armstrong
Liaison to the College of Education, Richard J. Daley Library
Assistant Reference Librarian, Associate Professor, Coordinator of Library Instruction
Phone: 312-413-3045  Email: annie@uic.edu

 

Through inter-library loan, students may borrow materials from UIC’s Library of the Health Sciences, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, or libraries of numerous other universities.  Other Chicago-area libraries are also open for use by UIC graduate students.  Students may apply to reserve a study carrel in the library stacks.  Details about library services and hours are available at the library’s website. 

 

The College of Education’s Educational Technology Laboratory

The College of Education strives to provide an environment that encourages and enables faculty, students, and staff to explore, experiment with, and use advanced technologies.  Many of the technology resources available to support your work may be found in the College’s Educational Technology Laboratory (ETL).  The ETL is located on the second floor of the ETMSW Building in Room 2011.  The lab has been renovated recently as a flexible learning environment, and has been redesigned so that the facility can also be used for whole class instruction and collaborative group work. It also continues to accommodate students who require assistance with hardware and software resources. 

The College of Education provides trained on-site support personnel in the ETL.  Support personnel provide technical assistance for the technology used in the College.  Because services, equipment, and software are continually being updated, the best way to become familiar with the ETL is to visit its website at http://etl.ed.uic.edu/   or to drop in and visit in person.

 

Financial Aid

Each year, various types of financial aid are available to degree-seeking students in the College of Education at UIC.  Please check the College of Education website for financial opportunities.

The opportunities described below are those coordinated by the College of Education or by the University.  Some of these are subject to change, so be sure to check the College of Education and Graduate College websites for updates about current availability and requirements.

 

Tuition and Selected Fees Waivers

Each semester, the Graduate College allocates a limited number of tuition and selected fees waivers to the College of Education.  To be eligible, you must be a degree-seeking student (either full-time or part-time), and not hold any appointment that covers tuition.  Tuition and Service Fee Waivers are awarded Fall, Spring, and Summer terms, and you must submit an application for each term that you want to be considered.  Eligibility for full-time waivers requires a minimum of 12 hours enrollment for the fall and spring semesters, and 6 hours for the summer term.  Eligibility for part-time waivers requires 8-11 hours enrollment for fall and spring semesters, and 3-5 hours for the summer term.

To apply, complete all parts of the Application for Tuition and Selected Fees Waiver  and submit the application and all required supporting documents to the Office of Student Services (3145 ETMSW).  You can get an application from the Office of Student Services, or it can be downloaded from the Financial Aid website.  The deadlines for submission are:

 

July 1                   Fall

November 1         Spring

March 1                Summer

 

Fellowships and Scholarships

A few fellowships and scholarships are available through the University and/or the Graduate College.  These awards provide a tuition and service fee waiver and a monthly stipend.  They begin in the fall semester of each academic year, but must be applied for early in the prior spring semester.  Competition for these awards is intense, and thorough preparation is the key to being successful.  All Graduate College fellowship applications must be reviewed in the College of Education by the Honors/Teaching Awards Committee in advance of the Graduate College deadlines.  Only the top applications that are judged to be competitive university wide are forwarded to the Graduate College for review.

If you are considering applying for one of these fellowships, contact your advisor early in the fall semester to help you prepare your application.  You should also ask other professors to write letters of recommendation for you at this time.  Giving yourself enough lead time is critical, as hastily prepared applications are rarely successful. 

The following fellowships are available through the Graduate College:

 

University Fellowship

Deadlines for application

 

Complete applications should be delivered to the Office of Student Services (3145 ETMSW).

 

Approximately 55 University Fellowships are awarded to outstanding students based on academic promise and scholarly achievement in an all-campus competition. 

Eligibility:

  • Masters and doctoral-level graduate students in any field of graduate study.

Registration Requirements: At least 12 hours each semester (6 in summer). Twelve month appointments require summer registration.

For complete information on this award and its specific requirements, consult the Graduate College website:  http://grad.uic.edu/cms/?pid=1000090l

 

Dean’s Scholar Fellowship

Deadlines for application

 

Complete applications should be delivered to the Office of Student Services (3145 ETMSW).

 

The Dean’s Scholar Award is presented by the Dean of the Graduate College in recognition of a student’s scholarly achievement.  It is intended to provide highly qualified, advanced-level graduate students with an opportunity to devote themselves to a period of intensive research without ongoing teaching obligations.   Recipients of the Dean's Scholar Award will receive a fellowship stipend of $25,000 for a twelve-month academic year and  a tuition and fee waiver from the Graduate College. Awards are not renewable.

Eligibility: Doctoral candidates only. Students must have passed their preliminary examination and have a plan approved by their department for their dissertation research. Dean’s scholars may not accept a teaching assistantship but may accept a research assistantship for not more than 50 percent time in his/her research field, or external support in the form of a fellowship for work directly related to the dissertation.

Each doctoral program may nominate a maximum of two students for the award.

Registration Requirements: At least 12 hours each semester (6 in summer). Twelve month appointments require summer registration.

Award information and requirements

 

Abraham Lincoln Fellowship

Deadlines for application

 

Complete applications should be delivered to the Office of Student Services (3145 ETMSW). 

 

The goal of the Abraham Lincoln Graduate Fellowship program is to increase the excellence and diversity of the student body.

Applicants must be:

  • Graduate students from historically underrepresented racial and ethnic minority groups, specifically Native American, African-American, Mexican-American, and Puerto Rican students are eligible to apply. 
  • Citizens or permanent residents of the United States, and graduates of a secondary school in the US or territories. 
  • Enrolled in a graduate program or have completed an application for fall admission.
  • Be on full status
  • Registered for at least 12 hours each semester (6 in summer). Twelve month appointments require summer registration

Application Procedures:   Selection of awardees is based on graduate and undergraduate record, standardized test scores, letters of recommendation, and the nominee's personal statement.

For complete information on this award and its specific requirements, consult the Graduate College website:  http://grad.uic.edu/cms/?pid=1000092l

 

Diversifying Faculty in Higher Education in Illinois—(DFI)

Please see the Graduate College website http://grad.uic.edu/cms/?pid=1000083 for submission deadlines for this award.

Please contact the Office of Student Services for the deadline for submission to the College.

Complete applications should be delivered to the Office of Student Services (3145 ETMSW).

The Diversifying Faculty in Higher Education in Illinois—(DFI) program was established by the Illinois General Assembly to provide financial assistance to members of traditionally underrepresented racial minority groups to pursue and complete graduate or professional degrees at Illinois institutions of higher education.  This is a state wide competition and involves an extensive application process. 

The award is renewable for one year for master’s students and for three additional years for doctoral candidates. Renewal is contingent on the recipient making satisfactory academic progress toward completion of the degree.

Eligibility:

  • Students from traditionally underrepresented minority groups (i.e., Native American, African-American, Mexican-American, and Puerto Rican graduate students) are eligible for this award.
  • Students must demonstrate financial need.
  • Students must be Illinois residents to apply.
  • Award recipients must agree to accept teaching or administrative employment at an Illinois postsecondary institution or with an Illinois higher education governing or coordinating board, or the recipients may be required to pay back a portion of the award.

Registration Requirements: At least 12 hours each semester (6 in summer).  Twelve month appointments require summer registration.

For complete information on this fellowship, please consult the Graduate College website:  http://grad.uic.edu/cms/?pid=1000083

The Graduate College offers helpful review sessions to help applicants maximize their applications.  Contact Demetria Ward-Kato in the Graduate College at deward@uic.edu or  (312) 413-2559 during the fall semester for more information and to find out when the sessions are scheduled.

 

The Martin Luther King, Jr. Scholarship 

Students apply directly for this award.  The Honors/Teaching Awards Committee does not review and rank applications.  Come to the Office of Student Services to pick up an application, or download it from the College of Education financial aid website or visit the scholarship website.  Applications are typically available early in the spring term.

This program was established in 1985 at UIC to encourage African-American, Latino(a), and Native-American UIC students who have demonstrated high academic achievement in the many fields where they have traditionally been underrepresented and who have shown commitment through community and campus service.  Thus, in an effort to keep Dr. Martin L. King, Jr.'s dream alive, these merit and/or monetary awards are given to undergraduates with a minimum of a 3.0 GPA, as well as to graduate and professional students with high academic achievement. 

Selection will be based on academic record, personal statement, recommendations, and demonstrated commitment to community/campus service.

Eligibility:

Continuing UIC African-American, Latino(a), or Native-American undergraduate students who have a current cumulative UIC GPA of at least a 3.0 (4.0 scale) and will achieve junior or senior status in the Fall semester are eligible to apply.  African-American, Latino(a) or Native-American graduate or professional students who have demonstrated high academic achievement are also eligible to apply. Graduate students must have completed at least one semester at UIC before applying for the Martin Luther King, Jr. Scholarship.

Applicants must plan to be enrolled full-time during the entire academic year.

Present or past holders of graduate and professional Martin Luther King, Jr. Scholarships are not eligible.  However, present or past holders of undergraduate Martin Luther King, Jr. Scholarships may reapply.

Applicants must be citizens or eligible non-citizens.

Full or part-time UIC Employees are not eligible.  Student workers and graduate assistants are eligible.

All application materials must be submitted to:

William Rodriguez, Chair

Martin Luther King Scholarship Selection Committee

The Office of the Dean of Students, 3030 SSB, MC 318

1200 West Harrison Street

Chicago, Illinois  60607

Applications are usually due by the end of March.  Check early in the spring semester for an application.

 

Graduate Assistantships

A number of teaching, research, or graduate assistantships are available each year.  College of Education faculty members, centers, and projects with available funds hire students into positions. For example, the College searches at times for people with teaching or similar experience to work in our teacher preparation programs.  Similarly, students with research skills or who wish to further develop those skills are also sought by College faculty for work on grant-supported research projects.

Your chance of securing an assistantship is increased if you make it known to various faculty members that you are looking for one, for example, via an introductory letter, email, and/or resumé in faculty mailboxes.  Tell your faculty advisor, and keep your eyes and ears open.

 

Graduate Student Council Travel Awards

The Graduate Student Council (GSC) is the governance organization of graduate students at UIC.  Each of the 66 departments within the Graduate College is represented by either an appointed or an elected representative.  GSC’s function is to sponsor academic and social activities for graduate students, provide travel funds to students presenting at professional conferences, and promote the general welfare of students through interaction with the University's administration.  Most of GSC’s annual budget is allocated to subsidizing students' travel expenses.  Eligibility for GSC travel funds is limited to graduate students from departments with active GSC representatives.  The GSC Travel Committee may give awards of up to $300 for travel expenses.  Students are limited to one award per fiscal year (July 1 to June 30).  Information and applications to the GSC travel fund and may be obtained from the GSC webpage at: http://www2.uic.edu/stud_orgs/gsc/travel_award.html

 

Graduate College Student Travel Awards

The Graduate College Student Travel Awards are intended to help defray the travel expenses of graduate students presenting research or scholarly work at a meeting of a nationally recognized scientific or scholarly society.  The Graduate College attempts to support as many qualified applicants as possible; however, awards are limited and contingent upon the availability of funds.  More information and an application form can be obtained from the Graduate College website:  http://grad.uic.edu/cms/?pid=1000086

 

Other Resources

Independent fellowships, scholarships, and grants are also administered by governmental agencies, foundations, corporations, and individuals.  For more information, contact Marie Khan in the Graduate College, 606 UH (312-355-3456 or mkhanj@uic.edu) or the reference desk of the UIC library.  In addition, loan programs open to all students are administered by the Office of Financial Aid (1800 SSB).  The Student Employment Office ( 2100 SSB) offers information about part-time employment, job reference materials, job listings, and referrals for employment to university departments and business firms in the Chicago area. 

Tips for Prospering in Doctoral Studies

Here are some tips that may be useful to you to prosper in your doctoral studies at UIC.  Take some time and review them.  Then try them.  They work!

 

Get Involved

Get involved in the life of the College of Education.  Attend the colloquia and workshops given by faculty and visiting scholars.  In the past, these workshops have provided advice on publishing, suggestions for presenting at conferences, and tips on preparing a curriculum vitae.  Take advantage of informal gatherings to get to know faculty members and fellow students.  Attend social gatherings.  Interact with people in the third floor Commons Area (3233 ETMSW) and meet with fellow students outside of class.

 

Get and Stay Connected 

Get connected to the Internet.  Your UIC netid is part of your UIC email address (netid@UIC.EDU) and is necessary:

  • To use various secured or personalized UIC and University of Illinois services.
  • To use the UIC portal page
  • To get an Enterprise ID, which is required to register.
  • To use any ACCC service: email, UIC-WiFi, personal computer labs and printers, and storage space for personal web pages.

For information about activating your netid, see http://www.uic.edu/depts/accc/accts/netids.html#students.  Information about such things as the location and hours of UIC’s computer labs, available software, and computer education opportunities is available at http://www.uic.edu/depts/accc/home/

Look out for the College of Education’s Graduate Student Listserv emails.  This listserv is used by the College to communicate with graduate students   and to post various messages including campus-wide announcements, fellowship and assistantship opportunities, job openings, and upcoming events.  It is a great way to stay connected to the College.  As a College of Education graduate student you are automatically subscribed to the listserv. If you encounter problems, contact Mike Herkes (mherkes@uic.edu) for assistance.

Join the Graduate College’s Graduate Student listserv.  This listserv is used by graduate students to communicate across disciplines.  It is also used by the Graduate College to disseminate important information.  The listserv is called GRADLIST@uic.edu.  Students may subscribe by sending an e-mail to: listserv@listserv.uic.edu, with the following in the BODY of the e-mail:  Subscribe gradlist First_name Last_name (replacing subscriber's first and last name for First_name Last_name).

Get to know the College faculty.  Introduce yourself.  Read their books and articles.  The members of the faculty are really very approachable and can provide a great deal of support as you work through your program.

Get involved in research and service projects.  There are many such opportunities in the College.  Talk with your faculty advisor about different centers and projects that operate under the auspices of the College.  Contact the faculty members who work with these centers and projects to learn more and to explore opportunities for you to work with them.  Some centers and projects have paid graduate assistantships to offer.  Explore those possibilities too.

Check the College website and the bulletin boards on the third floor to learn about College news and events.  Bulletin boards throughout the College provide information about the goings-on in particular departments and programs of the College.  Many faculty members also tape postings on their office doors.

Start an e-mail network among a group of colleagues with common interests.  This need not be limited to people in the College of Education or to people at UIC.

Make use of the Educational Technology Lab (ETL) (2011 ETMSW).  This lab contains both Macintosh and IBM compatible computers, plus scanners that you may use.  Contact the Lab (312-996-0133) or visit the ETL homepage http://maradona.ed.uic.edu/

 

Support One Another

One of the most valuable opportunities you have while here is the chance to get to know and form ties with other students—ties that create a human community with shared intellectual interests.  Fellow students can offer each other intellectual support and stimulation, empathy with the difficulties and problems most students encounter, and tips for surmounting those challenges.  Intellectual growth flourishes when people share with each other, listen to each other, encourage sincerely, and critique honestly.  Before you can reap those benefits, you must form relationships, which let people trust each other with fledgling ideas and papers.  The initiative for making this happen rests largely with students themselves.  But if you think faculty or administration can help, let us know.

 

Stay in Regular Contact with Your Faculty Advisor

Your advisor plays a vital role in your academic success and prosperity.  Set up an appointment to talk with your advisor at least once a term, especially to discuss your course selection.  Set up times to talk about what you are learning and ideas you may have for your own research.

 

Develop Your Writing Skills

Because writing is a critical part of doctoral studies and professional and academic life, you may want to improve your writing skills.  One way is by attending any of the writing courses offered at UIC and/or other universities in the Chicago metropolitan area.  Your faculty advisor can help you identify the right opportunity for you.  UIC’s Writing Center (http://www.uic.edu/depts/engl/writing/) offers peer tutoring on specific writing assignments.  Tutoring can be done at the Center or even online.  Call (312-413-2206) to make an appointment.  Finally, students are encouraged to form writing groups among themselves for purposes of support and development.

 

Register Early

Make timely appointments with your advisor each term before registering.  Register for courses as early as possible to avoid being closed out of highly-subscribed courses or to ensure that smaller seminar courses you want to take will not be cancelled because of low enrollment.  Before you pass the oral portion of the preliminary exam, you must register for at least one semester each year (summer term is optional) – even if you have finished all your coursework – in order to retain your status as a student in good standing and to avoid being dropped from your program administratively by the Graduate College. After you pass the oral portion of the preliminary exam, you must register each semester.  However, you do not need to register for summer unless you are taking the oral portion of the preliminary exam or defending your dissertation during that term. Students who have met all degree requirements except the dissertation may be eligible to register for 0 hours (see the Graduate College Catalog for more information: http://grad.uic.edu/cms/?pid=1000209).

Advance registration is by far the best way to register for a future term.  As a graduate student, you will be scheduled to register during the first week of registration, and therefore you should have little difficulty getting into the classes you want.  The University uses an online self-service registration system.  Check the UIC Class Schedule for registration procedures: https://ossswebcs.admin.uillinois.edu/PORTAL_UIC/classsch.html .  For questions about registration, call the Registration Help Line at 312- 996-8600.  You will not receive an online bill until after the semester begins.  Financial statements of student accounts will only be available online via the E-Bill system.

If you need a respite from continuous study for a limited amount of time, the Graduate Catalog outlines the procedure for requesting a leave of absence: http://www.uic.edu/gcat/GS.shtml#f .  This must be done formally to prevent you from being dropped administratively and having to reapply to your program.  If you wish to take a leave of absence, talk with your faculty advisor. 

Appendices

A.  Program Coordinators

Curriculum Studies:

Dr. William Watkins

wwatkins@uic.edu 

(312) 996-1325

3533 ETMSW

 

Educational Psychology:

Dr. George Karabatsos

georgek@uic.edu

(312) 413-1816

1034 ETMSW

 

Literacy, Language, and Culture:

Dr. Jim Gavelek

gavelek@uic.edu

(312) 996-5791

1412 ETMSW

 

Mathematics and Science Education:

Dr. Eric Gutstein and Dr. Maria Varelas

gutstein@uic.edu; mvarelas@uic.edu

(312) 413-2410; (312) 996-2454

3420 ETMSW; 3513 ETMSW

 

Policy Studies in Urban Education:

Dr. Andrea Evans

aeevans@uic.edu

(312) 996-5626

3042 ETMSW

 

Special Education:

Dr. Maria Tejero Hughes

marieth@uic.edu

(312) 413-1623

3432 ETMSW

 

Ed.D. in Urban Educational Leadership:

Dr. Steve Tozer

stozer@uic.edu

(312) 413-7782

1048 ETMSW

 

 

B.  Department Chairs and Staff

 

The doctoral programs operate within the following departments:

PROGRAM

DEPARTMENT

CHAIR

STAFF

Ph.D. in Education:

Curriculum and Instruction

  • Curriculum Studies
  • Literacy, Language, and Culture
  • Math and Science Education

Curriculum and Instruction

Dr. Danny Martin

dbmartin@uic.edu

(312) 413-0304

3238 ETMSW

Karen Lenhart Dop klenhart@uic.edu (312) 996-4509   3252 ETMSW

 

Sharon Earthely

earthely@uic.edu

(312) 996-4508

3252 ETMSW

 

Ph.D. in Educational Psychology

Educational Psychology

Dr. Kimberly Lawless

klawless@uic.edu

(312) 996-2359

1242 ETMSW

Alejandra Cantero

acante2@uic.edu

(312) 996-5651

3343 ETMSW

Ph.D. in Policy Studies in Urban Education

  • Educational Organization and Leadership
  • Social Foundations of Education

 

Ed.D in Urban Educational Leadership

Policy Studies

Dr. David Mayrowetz

dmayro@uic.edu

(312) 996-3326

3226 ETMSW

Alejandra Cantero

acante2@uic.edu

(312) 996-5651

3343 ETMSW

Ph.D. in Education:  Special Education

Special Education

Dr. Elizabeth Talbott

etalbott@uic.edu

(312) 413-8745

3448   ETMSW

Alejandra Cantero

acante2@uic.edu 

(312) 996-5651

3343 ETMSW

 

C. Office of Student Services

(OSS)

3145 ETMSW

Office Hours: Monday through Friday

8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

 

Associate Dean of Student Affairs:

Dr. Joy Eisen

jeisen@uic.edu

(312) 996-4532

 

Day-to-Day Functioning of OSS                               

Advising Materials                              

Advising Procedures                                                              

 

Room 3145

(312) 996-4532                                  

 

 

 

Doctoral Programs                                                           

   Preliminary & Dissertation Defense Forms            

   Status in the Program                                             

   Final Graduation Check

   Petitions for Extensions, Leave of Absence, etc.

 

 

Elise Wilson

Room 3145

(312) 996-4594

elise@uic.edu

 

Mailing Information for Prospective Students                       

Registration Process  

Grant permission for students to add courses that 

     have a College restriction or that need special 

     approvals              

Judy Prince

Room 3145

(312) 996-4532

princej@uic.edu

 

 

 

D. Faculty of the UIC College of Education

 

Karen Bean (Ph.D., University of Illinois at Chicago)

Clinical Assistant Professor, Curriculum and Instruction, (312) 355-1667, kbean@uic.edu

Dr. Bean’s professional interests are: literacy and literacy instruction in elementary schools, learning in a second language, learning contexts created in classrooms, and teacher professional development.  She teaches courses in the undergraduate and graduate elementary education programs.

 

Aerika Brittian (Ph.D., Tufts University)

Assistant Professor, Educational Psychology, (312) 996-9478, brittian@uic.edu

Dr. Brittian’s research examines person-context relations that exist between ethnic minority youth and their environment, such as aspects of identity (racial, ethnic, religious) and family cultural socialization, that promote positive developmental outcomes. She has conducted research in the United States and in South Africa, and her research has been published in journals such as Developmental Psychology, Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology, and Sex Roles.

 

Nancy Carter-Hill (Ed.D., Loyola University)

Clinical Assistant Professor, Educational Policy Studies, nchill@uic.edu

Dr. Carter-Hill is a leadership coach with UIC's Urban Education Leadership Program, where she successfully mentors students through principal residencies and school leadership positions in diverse school environments. Carter-Hill also serves as a Clinical Assistant Professor, teaching courses in the Education Policy Studies department at UIC's College of Education. She began her work at UIC in 2007 after a 34-year career as an educator, principal, professional developer, coach, mentor, and system-level leader. Her passion is developing leadership skills in building relational trust, developing specific strategies for engaging stakeholders in improving school climate and culture, and in creating and sustaining leadership teams as a means for improving educational outcomes.

 

Shelby Cosner (Ph.D., University of Wisconsin- Madison)

Associate Professor, Policy Studies, (312) 413-8249, sacosner@uic.edu

Dr. Cosner's research examines the role of school and district leadership in the development of organizational and teacher capacity for instructional and school improvement. Dr. Cosner has extensive experience in the field as a teacher, principal, and central office administrator,

working in both the elementary and secondary levels.  As a school principal, she had the rare opportunity to create and open a new middle school. As an administrator she worked with principals and their leadership teams to develop evidence-based approaches to improve student learning. She is also a consulting faculty member to UIC's Partnership READ.

 

 

Lisa Cushing (Ph.D., University of Oregon)

Associate Professor, Special Education, (312) 355-1794, lcushing@uic.edu  

Dr. Cushing's research and teaching interests focus on increasing the quality of life for individuals with significant disabilities through the improvement of educational, social and behavioral outcomes in inclusive settings. Her current scholarly interests include: the inclusion of students in middle and high school settings, differentiated instruction such as peer mediated supports, individuals with low incidence disabilities including those identified with Autism Spectrum Disorder, transition from school, and positive behavioral interventions and support.

 

Joy Eisen (Ed.D., Harvard University)

Associate Dean for Student Affairs and Assistant Professor with a Courtesy Faculty appointment in Educational Policy Studies, (312) 996-4532, jeisen@uic.edu

Dr. Eisen is Associate Dean for Student Affairs for the College of Education, and holds a courtesy faculty appointment in the Department of Educational Policy Studies.  Her research interests include organization and administration of higher education, academic departments and department chairs, educational policy, research design, and qualitative research methods.

 

Andrea Evans (Ph.D., University of Illinois at Chicago)

Associate Professor, Educational Policy Studies, (312) 996-5626, aeevans@uic.edu

Dr. Evans' scholarly interests include school organizational analysis, education policy, educational leadership, and leadership preparation.  Her most recent research work focuses on elementary school organizations and Pre-K – 8 chronic absenteeism.   She is an associate editor of the Handbook of Research on Leadership for Equity and Diversity (Routledge, 2013) and serves on the editorial board of Educational Administration Quarterly.  Dr. Evans is the coordinator of the Ph. D Program in Educational Policy Studies.

 

James Gavelek (Ph.D., Washington State University) 

Associate Professor, Curriculum and Instruction, (312) 996-5791, gavelek@uic.edu

Dr. Gavelek’s scholarly interests focus on the role of language and other embodied semiotic processes in understanding the development of mind.  He is especially interested in the implications of an integrated and embodied semiotics for rethinking teaching, learning and the school curriculum.  Dr. Gavelek serves on the editorial boards of Reading Research Quarterly and Yearbook of the National Reading Conference. He is the coordinator of the Ph.D. program in Literacy, Language, and Culture.

 

Susan Goldman (Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh)

Professor, Curriculum and Instruction, (312) 996-4462, sgoldman@uic.edu

Dr. Goldman's research activities focus on the psychological processes involved in how people understand and learn from text, discourse, multimedia, and conversation (in-person and online). The multimedia and text research examine learning from single and multiple sources presented in traditional print or electronic media. She is also an associate editor for the Journal of the Society of Text and Discourse and co-director of the UIC Center for the Study of Learning, Instruction, and Teacher Development.

 

Gerald Graff (Ph.D., Stanford University)

Professor, Curriculum and Instruction, (312) 413-9364, ggraff@uic.edu

Dr. Graff has written five books, including the recent Clueless in Academe: How Schooling Obscures the Life of the Mind, and edited six others in a long career advocating ways that educational institutions can close the gap between academic intellectual culture and that of its students and other citizens.  His new textbook is They Say/I Say: The Moves That Matter in Academic Writing (co-written with Cathy Birkenstein-Graff). He is a former Guggenheim Fellow and has lectured or consulted on curricular issues at more than 250 colleges and universities. 

 

Eric ("Rico") Gutstein (Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Professor, Curriculum and Instruction, (312) 413-2410, gutstein@uic.edu

Dr. Gutstein is an advocate in the teaching for social justice movement, explained in his recent book (as co-editor), Rethinking Mathematics: Teaching Social Justice by the Numbers. His research emphasizes social justice and literacy in multicultural urban contexts. He also is a co-teacher in a Chicago public school.

 

Stacey Horn (Ph.D., University of Maryland)

Professor, Educational Psychology, (312) 413-3679, sshorn@uic.edu

Dr. Horn is a developmental psychologist who studies social cognitive development as it relates to intergroup relationships in adolescence, particularly within the school context.  More specifically, she is interested in adolescents' social and moral reasoning regarding discrimination and harassment based on sexual orientation, gender identity, and adolescents’ peer group memberships.  Further, Dr. Horn is interested in school as a context for social development and her research, teaching, and youth advocacy center around ensuring that schools and other youth serving organization are contexts that foster and promote positive developmental outcomes for all young people.

 

Marie Tejero Hughes (Ph.D., University of Miami)

Associate Professor, Special Education, (312) 413-1623, marieth@uic.edu

Dr Hughes' primary areas of research are reading, learning disabilities, and family involvement in education. Dr. Hughes has extensive experience as a principal investigator of U.S. Department of Education funded research and personnel preparation projects. She has published articles and chapters focusing on instructional methods for general and special education teachers. Through her research, writing, and professional activities she has maintained a commitment to improving outcomes for students with special needs and their families.

 

Marisha Humphries (Ph.D., University of Illinois at Chicago)

Associate Professor, Educational Psychology, (312) 996-4677, mhumphri@uic.edu

Dr. Humphries is a licensed clinical psychologist and is also trained as a prevention scientist. She conducts basic research on the social development of African-American children and adolescents. Specifically, her research focuses on young African-Americans’ emotional and social competence.

 

George Karabatsos (Ph.D., University of Chicago)

Professor, Educational Psychology, (312) 413-1816, georgek@uic.edu

Dr. Karabatsos's research involves the development of new statistical models to help further the understanding of phenomena relating to the educational and psychological sciences. Such developments are based on the ideas of Bayesian inference, nonparametric statistics, and hierarchical modeling.

 

Eleni Katsarou (Ph.D., University of Illinois at Chicago)

Clinical Full Professor, Curriculum and Instruction, (312) 996-5297, elenik@uic.edu

Dr. Katsarou researches teacher education and building community with urban teachers and schools.  She prepares undergraduates and graduate students for careers in urban schools.  Her work enhances pre-service teacher preparation to include mentoring, collaborative efforts, and honing literacy and other skills toward teaching excellence and long career service.

 

Gregory Larnell (Ph.D., Michigan State University)

Assistant Professor, Curriculum and Instruction, (312) 996-5638, glarnell@uic.edu

Dr. Larnell’s primary research and teaching interests center on mathematics education and, specifically, the intersection of mathematics learning and socialization, identity construction, race and equity. Dr. Larnell has conducted independent and collaborative research on mathematics curriculum, state- and national standards in mathematics, and equitable access to mathematics learning opportunities. His most recent work critically examines the mathematics learning experiences of African American students in both K-12 and postsecondary contexts. 

 

Kimberly Lawless (Ph.D., University of Connecticut)

Professor, Educational Psychology, (312) 996-2359, klawless@uic.edu

Dr. Lawless researches the effectiveness of technology in classrooms toward improving reading comprehension skills of K-12 students.  She writes and publishes widely on educational technology, instructional science, and reading. Dr. Lawless serves on the editorial review boards for several professional journals, including the International Journal of Instructional Media and the Journal of Research on Computers in Education, among others. She recently received the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education Best Practice Award for Technology in Teacher Education.

 

Pauline Lipman (Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Professor, Educational Policy Studies, (312) 413-4413, plipman@uic.edu

Dr.  Lipman’s research focuses on race and class inequality in schools, globalization and neo-liberal urban development, and the political economy and cultural politics of race in urban education. She is the director of UIC’s Collaborative for Equity and Justice in Education, a founder of Teachers for Social Justice, and author of High Stakes Education: Inequality, Globalization, and Urban School Reform and Race, Class and Power in School Restructuring, and numerous articles and book chapters.

 

Norma Lopez-Reyna (Ph.D., University of California, Santa Barbara)

Associate Professor, Special Education, (312) 413-8761, nlr@uic.edu

Dr. Lopez-Reyna specializes in assessment and instruction of students with disabilities and who are English Language Learners, parent involvement in their children's learning, and bilingual special education teacher education. She is director of the UIC Assessment Clinic, which provides services for children aged 5-18 who are experiencing learning difficulties; and she is also the director of the Monarch Center, which provides grantsmanship and program development services to special education faculty at HBCUs and other minority institutions of higher learning.

 

Daniel Maggin (Ph.D.,Vanderbilt University)

Assistant Professor, Special Education, (312) 413-1978 dmaggin@uic.edu

Dr. Maggin's research addresses three areas related to the education of students with and at risk for developing emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD) including (a) the identification of evidence-based practices through the use of various research synthesis methods, (b) the training of school personnel to use a continuum of effective assessment and intervention methods to identify and treat students with varying behavioral profiles, and (c) the development of school-based methods to ensure that effective interventions are implemented with integrity.

 

Catherine Main (M. Ed., University of Illinois at Chicago)

Clinical Lecturer, Educational Psychology, (312) 355-2471, cmain@uic.edu

Ms. Main developed and administers the Blended Early Childhood/Early Childhood Special Education Program, which prepares teachers to work with all children regardless of ability and ages birth to 8 years of age, and the Early Childhood Early Certification Program. She primarily provides in-school instruction for teacher candidates. She  teaches courses that emphasize collaborating with families, community members, and professionals for early childhood and special education, teaches primary grade methods courses and student teaching seminars in early childhood education.

 

Danny Martin (Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley)

Professor, Curriculum and Instruction, (312) 413-0304, dbmartin@uic.edu

Dr. Martin studies mathematics education in K-20 contexts. He is particularly interested in the mathematical experiences of African-Americans and utilizes qualitative studies of mathematics socialization and the construction of mathematics identities in classroom and community contexts. He is a former National Academy of Education/Spencer Foundation Postdoctoral Fellow. Among his publications is Mathematics Success and Failure Among African American Youth.

 

Peter Martinez (B.A., Loyola University of Chicago)

Clinical Instructor, Educational Policy Studies, (312) 996-7327, pmartinz@uic.edu

Mr. Martinez is a director of the Urban Leadership Program and focuses on the development of school leadership: teacher leaders, principals, system leaders, and parent and community leaders working in urban areas. He was formerly a Senior Program Officer at the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation where he managed the $40 million Chicago Education Initiative portfolio that funded research and dissemination, school restructuring, teacher and principal professional development and union reform, and parent and community involvement.

 

Kathleen Mayer (Ed.D., Loyola University)

Clinical Assistant Professor, Educational Policy Studies, kpmayer@uic.edu

Dr. Mayer is a former Peace Corps volunteer who served as an elementary and high school educator for more than thirty years. As principal of Carson Elementary from 1991 to 2007, she achieved some of the highest standardized test scores gains in the district.  The school was recognized as a School of Distinction by the district and was also featured in a Designs for Change study as one of the district’s outstanding low-income schools. Dr. Mayer was named a Chicago Public Schools Principal of Excellence and admitted to a select group of Chicago principals who received leadership training through the district’s Whitman Academy.

 

David Mayrowetz (Ed.D., Rutgers University)

Associate Professor, Educational Policy Studies, (312) 996-3326, dmayro@uic.edu

Dr. Mayrowetz examines educational reforms from their development to implementation, and the important influence that actors (i.e., teachers and administrators) and organizations (i.e., schools and courts) have on those processes.  He has studied a variety of reform initiatives, mostly in urban contexts, dealing with mathematics instruction, the placement of students with disabilities, and distributed leadership.

 

Christopher Miller (Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Clinical Assistant Professor, Educational Policy Studies, (312) 413-2415, clmiller@uic.edu

Dr. Miller studies how local and district school structures influence school curricula. He researches how those structures impact curriculum development and management – particularly science – with special attention to district-level office support for elementary science teaching in K-12 schools.

 

Carole Mitchener (Ph.D., University of Denver)

Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and

Associate Professor, Curriculum and Instruction, (312) 996-8141, cmitchen@uic.edu

Dr. Mitchener’s research interests include science education, teacher education, and curriculum studies. In addition, she also studies various approaches to teacher education and professional development and their influence on instructional practices.

 

Zitlali (“Lali”) Morales (Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles)

Assistant Professor, Curriculum and Instruction, (312) 996-8144, zitlali@uic.edu

Dr. Morales studies how English language learners (ELLs) learn best in dual language contexts. In particular, she examines how language ideologies affect the context of schooling for immigrants and ELLs, and studies classroom interactions through the use of qualitative methods. She views language acquisition from a sociocultural perspective as participants learning to use language in the context of cultural practices. Her current research focuses on better preparing teachers to meet their students' needs in both primary language and sheltered English contexts by leveraging the language and cultural knowledge that students bring to the classroom. Other research projects include exploring the learner identities of linguistic minority students in Spanish-English dual immersion programs. Dr. Morales specializes in additive models of language acquisition for English language learners and believes in promoting multilingualism for all students.

 

Carol Myford (Ph.D., University of Chicago)

Associate Professor, Educational Psychology, (312) 355-4680, cmyford@uic.edu

Dr. Myford is a methodologist whose research centers on student test construction, assessment, and program evaluations in various academic and professional disciplines. She is a co-author of What Did Students Learn and How Do We Know? A Practical Guide to Designing and Carrying Out a Classroom Music Assessment.

 

Marlynne Nishimura (M.Ed., University of Illinois at Chicago)

Clinical Lecturer, Curriculum and Instruction, (312) 413-3904 marlynne@uic.edu

Ms. Nishimura studies mathematics and science teaching and learning, teacher preparation at the elementary and secondary level, and curriculum development.  Her interest focuses upon issues of equity and advocacy for science education.

 

Michele Parker-Katz (Ph.D., Michigan State University)

Clinical Full Professor, Special Education, (312) 996-2539, mparker@uic.edu

Dr. Parker-Katz's research interests include teacher learning and teacher preparation for special and general educators, and beginning teacher induction, especially in terms of affecting urban school change; mentoring of new teachers; moral and political aspects of schooling; qualitative inquiry in schools.

 

James Pellegrino (Ph.D., University of Colorado at Boulder)

Distinguished Professor, Curriculum and Instruction, (312) 355-2493, pellegjw@uic.edu

Dr. Pellegrino researches the thinking and learning of children and adults and the implications of cognitive research and theory for assessment and instructional practice. He analyzes complex learning environments, including those incorporating information technology, with the goal of understanding the nature of student learning and conditions that foster deep understanding. He has contributed to numerous books and journals and is co-director of the UIC Center for the Study of Learning, Instruction, and Teacher Development.

 

Nathan Phillips (Ph.D., Vanderbilt University)

Assistant Professor, Curriculum and Instruction, (312) 996-4669, phillipn@uic.edu

Dr. Phillips researches the geographies of literacy and learning--particularly youth learning. He studies young people's spatial literacies and media literacies in and out of school, across virtual and physical landscapes, and among multiple media. He is particularly interested in these literacies and mobilities as they relate to the possibilities for young people to actively and critically participate in civic processes that have an impact on their lives now and in the future.

 

Pamela Quiroz (Ph.D., University of Chicago)

Professor, Educational Policy Studies, (312) 413-9185, paquiroz@uic.edu

Dr. Quiroz studies socioeconomic, racial, and ethnic inequality in educational institutions, and the educational success of Latino students. She has published both qualitative and quantitative studies addressing topics such as teachers' working conditions and school organization.

 

Joshua Radinsky (Ph.D., Northwestern University)

Associate Professor, Curriculum and Instruction, (312) 413-0326, joshuar@uic.edu

Dr. Radinsky teaches students to learn to reason with visual information. His research applies socio-cultural theory to the study of teaching and learning using visual data, with a focus on historical and social inquiry.  He also incorporates the design and adaptation of learning environments to analyze how people learn, individually and socially.  This research informs, and is informed by, professional development and teacher education in the social sciences, and studies of the social contexts of schooling in urban areas.

 

 

Arthi Rao (Ed.D., DePaul University, Chicago)

Clinical Assistant Professor, Curriculum and Instruction, (312) 355-2473, arao6@uic.edu

Dr. Rao’s current teaching responsibilities focus on issues of critical multiculturalism in the urban elementary classroom.  She also helps her teacher candidates bridge the theory-practice gap in a seminar coupled with field observations during the student teaching semesters.  Her instruction across classes emphasizes the importance of culturally responsive pedagogy in all aspects of teaching:  community building/learning environment, planning, instruction, and assessment.  Dr. Rao's research interests include language program models and their impact on English language learner academic performance and perceptions of schooling, pre-service teacher education, as well as induction support in the beginning years of urban teaching.  

 

Taffy Raphael (Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)

Professor, Curriculum and Instruction, (312) 355-4178, taffy@uic.edu

Dr. Raphael is the director of Partnership READ, a standards-based collaborative initiative to improve literacy in Chicago Public Schools. Her research and teaching interests include instructional research in literacy teaching and learning, teacher professional development and inquiry, classroom discourse and learning through conversation. Her work is published in both literacy and education journals, and in 13 books.  Dr. Raphael has served as an editorial board member of the Journal of Literacy Research and Reading Research Quarterly, on the review board for The Reading Teacher, and is a member of the International Reading Association Reading Hall of Fame.

 

Aria Razfar (Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles)

Associate Professor, Curriculum and Instruction, (312) 413-8373, arazfar@uic.edu

Dr. Razfar's research interests are grounded in sociocultural theories of language, learning, and human development. In particular, he employs linguistic anthropological perspectives such as language socialization and language ideologies for the purposes of understanding learning and development in urban schools. His work is anchored in communities whose language practices have been historically marginalized in many formal and official spaces of society; thus, there is an explicit social justice character to his research.

 

Christine Salisbury (Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Professor, Special Education, (312) 413-1563, csalis1@uic.edu

Dr. Salisbury engages in policy-based, program improvement and reform research.  She is involved in the development of model early intervention programs in Chicago, and in elementary school reforms designed to promote the inclusion of students with disabilities in general education classrooms.  She is particularly interested in low-incidence populations and systemic responses to their educational support needs.

 

Kathleen Sheridan (Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, Madison)

Associate Dean for Licensure Programs and Technology and

Associate Professor, Educational Psychology, (312) 996-9177, ksherid9@uic.edu

Dr. Sheridan’s research interests include online learning and course development in higher education. Her research interests include Higher Education Leadership; Program and Curriculum Design and Development; Online Learning in Higher Education, Evaluation and Improvement of Online Learning; Child Development; Family Systems; Child, Family and Community Relationships; Kindergarten Readiness, Accreditation in Higher Education and Teacher Education Programs.

 

Celina Sima (Ph.D., Northwestern University)

Visiting Associate Professor, Educational Policy Studies, (312) 413-3823, celinas@uic.edu

In addition to her role as an administrator, Dr. Sima conducts research on higher education planning and policy.  Particular areas of interest include the examination of general education in the undergraduate curriculum, evaluation of strategies for the improvement of undergraduate student transfer, and faculty retention strategies. Dr. Sima has taught Research Designs for Policy, Public Sector Strategic Planning, Organization and Administration of Higher Education, History of Higher Education and Student Development Theory.

 

Everett Smith (Ph.D., University of Connecticut)

Professor, Educational Psychology, (312) evsmith@uic.edu

Dr. Smith specializes in Rasch measurement. His research interests include test and rating scale design and analysis, testing model robustness, and, in general, applications of fundamental measurement to problems found in licensure and certification testing and the social, behavioral, health, rehabilitation, and medical sciences. Dr. Smith currently serves as the Director of the MESA Laboratory, which provides consulting services to students, faculty and staff in the College.

 

David Omotoso Stovall (Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)

Associate Professor, Educational Policy Studies, (312) 413-5014, dostoval@uic.edu

Dr. Stovall studies the influence of race in urban education, community development, and housing. His work investigates the significance of race in the quality of schools located in communities that are changing both racially and economically. From a practical and theoretical perspective, his research draws from Critical Race Theory, educational policy analysis, sociology, urban planning, political science, community organizing, and youth culture.

 

Benjamin Superfine (J.D., Ph.D., University of Michigan)

Associate Professor, Educational Policy Studies, (312) 355-0362, bsuperfi@uic.edu

Dr. Superfine examines education law and policy, education politics, the incorporation of scientific knowledge into the legal and policy processes, and school finance reform. He also evaluates the relationship between education policy and education law—such as the federal “No Child Left Behind” legislation—focusing on standards-based reform and federal and state accountability policies.

 

Elizabeth Talbott (Ph.D., University of Virginia)

Associate Professor, Special Education, (312) 413-8745, etalbott@uic.edu

Dr. Talbott conducts her research on the social and emotional development of urban adolescent girls and educational interventions for urban girls and boys with mental health problems, including aggression. Her research includes studying these behaviors with teachers and mental health clinicians at several Chicago public schools.

 

Alfred W. Tatum (Ph.D., University Of Illinois at Chicago) 

Dean and

Associate Professor, Curriculum and Instruction, (312) 413-3883, atatum1@uic.edu

Dr. Tatum’s research foci are the literacy development of African American male adolescents, adolescent literacy, and teacher professional development in urban middle schools and high schools.  He is concerned with developing a literacy model for adolescents that will inform policy and practice and with building the textual lineages of African American males.

 

William Teale (Ed.D., University of Virginia)

Professor, Curriculum and Instruction, (312) 996-4669, wteale@uic.edu

Dr. Teale researches emergent literacy, beginning reading and writing instruction, and children's literature and literacy education, which is applied in early education classrooms in Chicago. He also analyzes technology and teacher education for literacy instruction and is the author or editor of several books, including Emergent Literacy: Writing and Reading. He is also a member of the International Reading Association Reading Hall of Fame.

 

Theresa Thorkildsen (Ph.D., Purdue University)

Professor, Educational Psychology, (312) 996-8138, thork@uic.edu

Dr. Thorkildsen studies students' motivation and moral functioning in school settings. She writes widely about her research in many publications, and is an associate editor of the journal Child Development, and is an editorial board member of Educational Psychologist, Journal of Educational Psychology, Journal of Research on Adolescence, and PsycCRITIQUES--Contemporary Psychology: APA Review of Books.  Dr. Thorkildsen is also a fellow of the American Psychological Association.

 

Steven Tozer (Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)

Professor, Educational Policy Studies, (312) 413-7782, stozer@uic.edu

Dr. Tozer is the author, co-author, or editor of five books on the social contexts of schooling, including School and Society: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives, now in its fifth edition. He has served as President of the American Educational Studies Association and the Council for Social Foundations of Education.

 

Victoria Trinder (Ph.D., University of Illinois at Chicago)

Clinical Assistant Professor, Curriculum and Instruction, (312) 413-7747, vtrinder@uic.edu

Dr. Trinder's teaching and research interests are: 1) to prepare high-quality graduate and undergraduate students in critical examination of schooling in the national and international realms, while preparing for meaningful inquiry into active participation in society through democratic structures and advocacy for its youngest members;  2) to integrate her creative and literary pursuits with those embedded in the world of progressive, holistic, and global initiatives in public education; 3) to share her unique experiences in narrative-inquiry research, teacher mentoring, and social philosophy with the intended and critical objectives of equity for young people and renewal of the public sphere, via innovative and interdisciplinary notions of learning.

 

Maria Varelas (Ph.D., University of Illinois at Chicago)

Professor, Curriculum and Instruction, (312) 996-2454, mvarelas@uic.edu

Dr. Varelas studies teaching, learning, and integrated science-literacy instruction in urban elementary-school and college science classrooms.  Her collaborative work and research with teachers, faculty, and graduate students appears in numerous journals and various edited books and has been presented at many conferences.

 

Federico Waitoller (Ph.D., Arizona State University, Tempe)

Assistant Professor, Special Education, (312) 413-2116, fwaitoll@uic.edu

Dr. Waitoller’s research agenda focuses on two strands related to the inclusion of culturally and linguistically diverse special education students: (a) the development and implementation of inclusive education policies, practices, and tools and (b) teacher learning for inclusive education. He approaches these interests from a socio-cultural and international perspective.

 

Torica Webb (M.Ed., Columbia University, New York)

Assistant Professor, Curriculum and Instruction, (312) 996-8842, tlwebb@uic.edu

Torica Webb’s primary scholarly interest uses the underpinnings of anthropology and
education to explore the development of political ideals and behaviors, and formal/informal education for democratic citizenship.  Specifically, she focuses on indigenous education and its implications for civic and political engagement among Maori youth in Aotearoa/New Zealand. She is also interested in the sociocultural impact of educational achievement in the lives of professional African American women, and training graduate students in the responsible conduct of research and ethical scholarship.

 

Rebecca Woodard (Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)

Assistant Professor, Curriculum and Instruction, (312) 996-5499, rwoodard@uic.edu

Dr. Woodard's research interests center on sociocultural processes of teaching writing, including qualitative studies of the practices involved in teaching that stretch beyond school walls and the development of more equitable instructional practices related to students' written and spoken language use in schools, such as the ways teachers assess writing, value and incorporate out-of-school literacies and technologies, and structure classroom discourse.

 

Yue Yin, (Ph.D., Stanford University)

Associate Professor, Educational Psychology, (312) 355-1042, yueyin@uic.edu

Dr. Yin is particularly interested in classroom assessment and applied measurement. She has conducted research on performance assessment, concept mapping assessment, and formative assessment. In her research, she used learning theory as a foundation, and measurement and statistics as the tools, to examine ways of using assessments to improve students' learning. Her teaching interests include measurement and applied statistics.

 

E.  Full Members of the Graduate College*

The Graduate College requires that chairs of preliminary examination and dissertation committees be full members of the Graduate College.  Full Graduate College membership is also required for several additional members of these committees; please refer to sections of this handbook on preliminary examination and dissertation committees for specific regulations. 
 
Below is a list of current COE faculty with full Graduate College membership. For a full list of Graduate College faculty members go to the Graduate College website: http://grad.uic.edu/cms/?pid=1000207

 

Aerika Brittian**
Shelby Cosner
Lisa Cushing
Andrea Evans**
James R. Gavelek
Artin Goncu
Eric Gutstein
Stacey S. Horn
Marie Tejero Hughes
Marisha L. Humphries
George Karabatsos
Gregory Larnell
Kimberly A. Lawless
Pauline Lipman
Norma Lopez-Reyna
Daniel Maggin
Danny Martin
David Mayrowetz
Carole P. Mitchener
P. Zitlali Morales
Carol M. Myford
Nathan Phillips**
Pamela Anne Quiroz
Joshua Radinsky
Taffy E. Raphael
Aria Razfar
Christine Salisbury
Everett V. Smith, Jr.
Benjamin Superfine
David Omotoso Stovall
Elizabeth Talbott
Alfred W. Tatum
William H. Teale
Theresa A. Thorkildsen
Steven Tozer
Maria Varelas
Federico Waitoller
Rebecca Woodard**
Yue Yin

 

*for a full list of members, including recent retirees who retain Full Member status for committees, go to the Graduate College website http://grad.uic.edu/cms/?pid=1000207

**Graduate College approval pending

 

 

F.  Public Formal Grievance Procedures

University of Illinois at Chicago

I.          Introduction

These procedures have been implemented to address complaints of discrimination on the basis of age and/or disability in any activity, policy, rule, standard, or method of administration that is related to the operation of University’s programs.

II.         Eligibility

These procedures may be used by any member of the public who alleges age (Under the Age Discrimination Act) or disability (Under Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act) discrimination on the basis of class.  However, anyone who wishes to challenge a decision made about them by an agent of the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) in the course of their employment or enrollment at UIC must utilize the UIC Academic Grievance Procedures.

III.        Definitions

A.         Grievance:     A written statement submitted by a Grievant identifying  the activity, policy, rule, standard or method of administration he/she claims to be discriminatory on the basis of age and/or disability and explaining the manner in which that activity, policy, rule, standard or method of administration discriminates.  All Grievances must be signed by the Grievant and must outline the Grievant’s allegations in as much detail as possible.

B.         Grievant:       Any member of the public who submits a Grievance.

C.        Grievance Officer:   The assigned investigator of the UIC Office for Access and Equity can be contacted at the address below:             

Office for Access and Equity (M/C 602)

809 South Marshfield Avenue, Room 718

Chicago, IL 60612-7207

(312) 996-8670 Fax (312) 413-0055

http://www.uic.edu/depts/oae

 

D.        Appeals Officer:       The Associate Chancellor for Access and Equity or his/her designee.

E.         Days:   Any reference to “days” herein shall refer to business days (excluding weekends and federal holidays).

F.         Record:          The complete record of a Grievance will consist of the original Grievance and any supporting information or documentation submitted with that Grievance, the Grievance Officer’s findings, the Appeal (if any) and any additional information or documentation submitted with the Appeal, the Appeal Officer’s findings, and any communications and notices relative to the Grievance.  The Record will be maintained for at least five (5) years following the final decision. 

 

 

III.        Grievance Process

 

A.Filing of the Grievance:  The Grievant must file his/her Grievance with the Grievance Officer no later than ten (10) days after he/she becomes aware of the offending activity, policy, standard or method of administration.

B.Investigation:The Grievance Officer shall conduct an appropriate investigation of the issues raised in the Grievance.  The Grievant shall be given an opportunity to submit any relevant evidence he/she may have to support the Grievance.  Within fourteen days (14) of submission of the Grievance, the Grievance Officer shall issue his/her findings.  In the event the Grievance Officer finds evidence of discrimination in the activity, policy, standard or method of administration, he/she shall make recommendations for change(s) and shall coordinate the efforts for change(s) with the department/unit/college whose activity, policy, standard or method of administration is at issue.  Furthermore, in the event that the individual was adversely affected by a decision made pursuant to a discriminatory process, policy, activity, standard or method of administration, the individual will be given the opportunity for the decision to be reconsidered according to the revised process, policy, etc…  In those cases where the Grievance Officer finds no evidence of discrimination, he/she shall send written notice of that finding to the Grievant within that 14-day time period.  Said notice shall inform the Grievant of his/her right to appeal the finding to the Appeals Officer within five (5) days of receipt of the notice.

C.Appeal:           An appeal of the Grievance Officer’s findings must be in writing and must state the basis for the appeal, providing any additional evidence or information that may support the Grievant’s claim of discrimination.  The Appeals Officer shall review the Grievance Officer’s record and any information/evidence submitted with the Appeal and shall issue findings within ten (10) days of receipt of the appeal.   In the event the Appeals Officer finds evidence of discrimination in the activity, policy, standard or method of administration, he/she shall make recommendations for changes.  In those cases where the Appeals Officer finds no evidence of discrimination, he/she shall send written notice of that finding to the Grievant within that 10-day time period.   There shall be no further levels of review or appeal beyond the Appeals Officer.

 

Deviation from the Process:           Upon proof of extenuating circumstances, the Chancellor and only the Chancellor may approve a deviation from these procedures (e.g., extension of a deadline).

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