Faculty & Staff

Kristine M. Schutz

Assistant Professor

Dr. Kristine Schutz’s research focuses on improving literacy instruction in elementary classrooms, particularly for children from linguistically and culturally diverse backgrounds.  She conducts research on teacher learning inside design settings that situate pre-service and practicing teachers’ learning inside of practice, the specialized content knowledge for literacy teaching, and the specification of core instructional practices for K-8 educators and teacher educators. She is also interested in designing authentic and purposeful literacy learning opportunities that support children in learning to comprehend and compose complex texts. Dr. Schutz spent three years as the lead literacy research and design specialist at TeachingWorks at the University of Michigan. In this role, she developed materials to support literacy teacher educators’ implementation of a practice-based curriculum for teacher education and designed performance assessments and assessments of content knowledge for teaching literacy. She continues to explore these topics in her own research and in collaboration with the Core Practice Consortium. Dr. Schutz is a former dual language teacher and brings experience working with emergent bilingual children to her research and work with teachers. 

Education

2012 - PhD, University of Michigan, Educational Studies: Literacy, Language & Culture

2003 - MSEd, Northwestern University, Elementary Education

2000 - BA, University of Michigan, Spanish & Organizational Studies

Selected Publications

  • Schutz, K. M., Shaughnessy, M., & Grossman, P. (2018). Approximations of practice in teacher education.  In P. Grossman (Ed.), Teaching core practices in teacher education. Boston, MA: Harvard Educational Press.

  • Cartun, A., Schutz, K. M., Kelley-Peterson, M., & Franke, M. (2018). Core practices and the teacher education curriculum: Stories of practice. In P. Grossman (Ed.), Teaching core practices in teacher education. Boston, MA: Harvard Educational Press.

  • Schutz, K. M., & Hoffman, J. V. (2017). I practice teaching: Transforming our professional identities as literacy teacher through action research. The Reading Teacher, 71(1), 7-12.

  • Kucan, L., Palincsar, A. S., Busse, T., Heisey, N., Klingelhofer, R., Rimbey, M., & Schutz, K. M. (2011). Applying the Grossman et al. theoretical framework: The case of reading. Teachers College Record, 113(12), 2897-2921.

  • Palincsar, A. S. & Schutz, K. M. (2011). Reconnecting strategy instruction with its theoretical roots. Theory into Practice, 50(2), 85-92.

Courses Taught

401 Methods of Reading: Early Literacy in Urban Classrooms.

Hours
3

Exploration of literacy assessment and teaching (including decoding, early writing, spelling, oral language, and comprehension), with a focus on learning to read and write.
Course Information: Previously listed as ED 257.

402 Reading and Writing in the Content Areas: Intermediate Literacy in Urban Classrooms

Hours
3
Prerequisites

CI 401 and junior standing or above and admission to the Bachelor of Arts in Elementary Education program.

Exploration of advanced aspects of literacy instruction (e.g., comprehension, writing, literacy in the content areas), with a focus on reading and writing to learn.
Course Information: Previously listed as ED 340.

527 Reading Specialists as Literacy Leaders

Hours
4
Prerequisites
  • CI 450
  • CI 503
  • CI 504

Theories and practices related to the role of the reading specialist, including management and evaluation of support systems, programs, personnel, and professional development in literacy.

541 Oral Language: Its Development and Role in the Classroom

Hours
4
Prerequisites
  • CI 450
  • Either CI 503 or CI 504
  • Restricted to graduate students in education, psychology, or English

Analysis of oral language development and children's varying patterns of language use; analysis of talk in classroom settings and instructional decision-making processes to assess and optimize student learning. Extensive computer use required. Field work required.

581 Perspectives on Reading: Theory, Research and Practice

Hours
4
Prerequisites

Priority will be given to students admitted into the Literacy, Language, and Culture doctoral program

Introduction of doctoral students to perspectives underlying theory, research, and practices related to understanding reading and reading instruction. Study of how research and practice is framed, shaped, and constrained by theoretical perspectives.